Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Peter: Goedendag allemaal! Mijn naam is Peter.
Judith: Judith here! Absolute Beginner Season 1 , Lesson 6 - Would You Like To Order?
Judith: Hello, and welcome to DutchPOD101.com, where we study modern Dutch in a fun, educational format!
Peter: So, brush up on the Dutch that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Judith: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Peter, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Judith: In this lesson you'll will learn how to order something at a café.
Peter: This conversation takes place at a Dutch café.
Judith: The conversation is between Anna, Marijke and the waitress.
Peter: The speakers are in a business situation, therefore they will be speaking formal Dutch.
Judith: Let’s listen to the conversation?

Lesson conversation

Serveerster: Bent u klaar om te bestellen?
M: Ja, twee koffie graag.
A: Wat voor gebak heeft u?
Serveerster: Wij hebben appeltaart. Wij hebben lekkere appeltaart.
A: Waar staat de appeltaart?
Serveerster: Waarom vraagt u dat?
A: Ik houd niet van koude appeltaart.
M: Ik hou ook niet van koude appeltaart.
Serveerster: De appeltaart is niet koud. Wij hebben warme appeltaart.
M: Oké, twee koffie en twee stukken appeltaart, alstublieft.
Serveerster: Dank u wel.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Serveerster: Bent u klaar om te bestellen?
M: Ja, twee koffie graag.
A: Wat voor gebak heeft u?
Serveerster: Wij hebben appeltaart. Wij hebben lekkere appeltaart.
A: Waar staat de appeltaart?
Serveerster: Waarom vraagt u dat?
A: Ik houd niet van koude appeltaart.
M: Ik hou ook niet van koude appeltaart.
Serveerster: De appeltaart is niet koud. Wij hebben warme appeltaart.
M: Oké, twee koffie en twee stukken appeltaart, alstublieft.
Serveerster: Dank u wel.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Serveerster: Bent u klaar om te bestellen?
Judith: Are you ready to order?
M: Ja, twee koffie graag.
Judith: Yes, two coffees please.
A: Wat voor gebak heeft u?
Judith: What kinds of pastries do you have?
Serveerster: Wij hebben appeltaart. Wij hebben lekkere appeltaart.
Judith: We have apple pie. We have delicious apple pie.
A: Waar staat de appeltaart?
Judith: Where is [stands] the apple pie?
Serveerster: Waarom vraagt u dat?
Judith: Why do you ask [that]?
A: Ik houd niet van koude appeltaart.
Judith: I don’t like cold apple pie.
M: Ik hou ook niet van koude appeltaart.
Judith: I also don't like cold apple pie.
Serveerster: De appeltaart is niet koud. Wij hebben warme appeltaart.
Judith: The apple pie is not cold. We have warm apple pie.
M: Oké, twee koffie en twee stukken appeltaart, alstublieft.
Judith: Okay, two coffees and two pieces of apple pie, please.
Serveerster: Dank u wel.
Judith: Thank you very much.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judit: Okay, maybe we should talk a bit about the politeness and how not to offend people when you are in the Netherlands.
Peter: So the words “alstublieft” (for formal situations) and “alsjeblieft” (for informal situations) are used a lot in Dutch.
Judith: In general ‘alstublieft’ can translate, roughly, into various English terms and phrases.
Peter: 1 One meaning is "Please."
Judith: 2 Another meaning is "Here you go." when giving and receiving things.
Peter: 3 A third meaning is "You're welcome."
Peter: In general, Dutch people are polite but they believe in equality. When you start a conversation by using the “u” form (very formal), they will quickly tell you to use the “je” or jij” form (informal).
Judith: Although Dutch people are friendly and tolerant, they tend to keep that to themselves. They do not immediately come to talk to you as a stranger as an American might.
Peter: When you have a conversation, Dutch people will usually tell you frankly what they think and will not opt for polite phrases to explain a situation.
VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Judith: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Peter: klaar [natural native speed]
Judith: clear; ready
Peter: klaar [slowly]
Peter: klaar [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: om te [natural native speed]
Judith: in order to
Peter: om te [slowly]
Peter: om te [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: bestellen [natural native speed]
Judith: to order
Peter: be-stel-len [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: bestellen [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: graag [natural native speed]
Judith: please; gladly
Peter: graag [slowly]
Peter: graag [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: wat voor [natural native speed]
Judith: what kind of
Peter: wat voor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: wat voor [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: gebak [natural native speed]
Judith: pastry
Peter: ge-bak [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: gebak [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: appeltaart [natural native speed]
Judith: apple pie
Peter: ap-pel-taart [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: appeltaart [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: staan [natural native speed]
Judith: to stand
Peter: staan [slowly]
Peter: staan [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: waarom [natural native speed]
Judith: why
Peter: waar-om [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: waarom [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: vragen [natural native speed]
Judith: to ask
Peter: vra-gen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: vragen [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: houden van [natural native speed]
Judith: to like, love
Peter: houden van [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Peter: houden van [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: koud [natural native speed]
Judith: cold
Peter: koud [slowly]
Peter: koud [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: warm [natural native speed]
Judith: warm
Peter: warm [slowly]
Peter: warm [natural native speed]
Next:
Peter: stuk [natural native speed]
Judith: piece
Peter: stuk [slowly]
Peter: stuk [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Judith: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Peter: The first word we’ll look at is....
Peter: “Waarom“. This means "why" and it's another question word, as is “wat voor” (what kind of).
Judith: In both cases, we start the question with the question word and continue with the main verb.
Peter: Next, the word “graag” can have different meanings in Dutch. In the sentence “twee koffie graag”, it means "please". You could substitute “alstublieft” there, which can also mean “please”. “Alstublieft” is the polite form of “alsjeblieft”. You use "alstublieft" in formal situations and "alsjeblieft" when talking to friends.
Judith: Next we should probably explain something about the verb "houden".
Peter: Anna says “ik houd” whereas Marijke says “ik hou”. When you follow the stem rule and take away the -en from the verb, you get “houd”, so technically Anna would be right. But in the case of this verb, and some other verbs, both forms are correct. You can use either "ik hou" , more easy, or "ik houd" in writing and speaking.
Judith: Just be sure to choose one of them and don’t use both in the same conversation. That would be a bit funny.

Lesson focus

Peter: The grammar focus of this lesson is usage of "u".
Judith: "U" is a polite way of saying "you", similar to the French "vous" or German "Sie".
Peter: We use "u" when talking to strangers, to people who are older, or who are of higher status.
Judith: In all regular verbs, the “u” form gets the -t ending, just like the "jij" or "hij" form (grammar books call it the 2nd and 3rd person singular).
Peter: For example “u werkt" (you work), "u woont" (you live), "u neemt” (you take). The equivalent form of "zijn" is "u bent" (you are).
Judith: And for "hebben"?
Peter: The form of "hebben" can be either "u hebt" or "u heeft" (you have). Both forms are commonly used, both in written and in spoken language.

Outro

Judith: That just about does it for today.
Peter: Listeners, looking for a cheat sheet to memorizing Dutch vocabulary?
have you checked out our Video Vocab series?
Judith: These themed video lessons combine visual cues with the voices of native speakers.
Peter: Just another effective method of learning and retaining thousands of vocabulary words.
Judith: Go to DutchPod101.com...
Peter: ...click on the Video Lessons tab...
Judith: ...and hit play!
Peter: It's that easy.
Judith: But don't take our word for it.
Peter: Try it for yourself at DutchPod101.com
Judith: Alright, see you next time!
Peter: Doei!!

31 Comments

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DutchPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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DutchPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:28 PM
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Hello Anna,


Thank you for your question 👍

Yes, "stellen" can used in various ways. Below are a few examples:


* een vraag stellen - to ask a question

* iets op schrift stellen - to write something down

* stel, je kunt niet naar het feest komen.. - Let's assume you can not come to the party

* dat kun je wel stellen! - you can be sure of that!


Succes!


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

anna
Tuesday at 04:53 AM
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hallo! i learned the verb ask as 'stelen' and vraag meaning 'question', as in: ik stel een vraag. (i'm asking a question) are they interchangable? dank u wel.

DutchPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:21 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hoi Vitoria,


Thank you for commenting ? Well there are not really rules for this so it's unfortunately just a matter of memorizing but there are a few things you can keep in mind ;


DE

- feminine and masculine words

- names of frutis, trees and flowers

- names of rivers, mountains

- numbers and letters

- words that refer to a person (farmer, pilot etc)


HET

- neuter

- names of languages

- names of countries, cities etc

- names of metal ( iron, lead etc)

- wind directions

- sports and games ( basketball, scrabble etc)

- words that start with be-, ge-, ver-, ont-


Hope this helps ! Succes


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

Vitoria Aquino
Friday at 12:37 AM
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hallo!


Is there a specific rule to know when should I use de or het before words!? Or is it just a matter of memorize?

I appreciate any tips ;)


Dankjewel

DutchPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:47 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hoi Jiao,


Thank you for commenting :thumbsup:


If you want to conjugate a Dutch verb you need know the stem of the verb. Dutch infinitives always end with -en so this makes it easy to get the stem from a verb:


- Stem = Infinitive minus "en"


To walk - lopen - loop

To run - rennen - ren

To work - werken - werk


There are a few rules though and those are:


1) Long vowel infinitives require long vowel stems

2) A stem never ends in two identical consonants

3) A stem never ends in v or z

4) The stem of an '-iën verb' ends in ie


In your example you use the verb "houden". In this case both are correct:

- Ik hou

- Ik houd


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

jiao
Monday at 07:30 AM
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what is stem rule, so instead of ik houden, we can also use ik hou or ik koud. Thank you.

DutchPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:59 PM
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Hoi Shelley,


Thank you for sharing :thumbsup:


* Je loopt wel erg vlug.

* Loop je altijd zo snel?


je/jij before the verb - stem +t

je/jij after the verb -stem


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

Shelley
Sunday at 09:23 PM
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Hoi!


My Dutch friend asked me a stupid question, so I decided to say "Waarom vraagt je dat?" and he said I should have said "Waarom vraag je dat?" Then he said I use "vraagt" with jij, like in "Jij vraagt naar de bekende weg." I thought second person singular je/jij were conjugated the same way.


Dank je wel!


Shelley

DutchPod101.com
Tuesday at 02:11 PM
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Hoi Chelle,


Thank you for your question :thumbsup: Well the second and third person singular add -t to the stem.

Here the verb is 'vragen' and the stem is 'vraag'. We notice the second singular 'U' ( you - formal) so we have

to add -t.


Succes!


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

chelle
Friday at 07:31 PM
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why is it "Waarom vraagt u dat?" not "Waarom vraag u dat?"