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The Dutch Calendar: Talking About Dates in Dutch

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through DutchPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Dutch, as well as the months in Dutch to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Dutch?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can DutchPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Dutch


1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Dutch?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Dutch. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “vrijdag” (Friday) with “zaterdag” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “juli” (July), but you booked a flight for “juni” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Dutch calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Netherlands, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Wat ga je dit weekend doen?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Dutch or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Ik ga dit weekend reis.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Netherlands, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Ik ben van plan om thuis te blijven.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Dit weekend heb ik het druk.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Ik ben morgen vrij.

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Kunnen we dit opnieuw plannen?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Aan het eind van de maand heb ik genoeg tijd.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Welke tijd komt het beste bij je uit?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Is dit een goede datum voor je?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Ben je op die dag beschikbaar?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Kunnen we het zo snel mogelijk doen?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Ik ben elke avond beschikbaar.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Ik moet dit ruim van tevoren plannen.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. We moeten een andere datum vinden

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. Op die dag kan ik niet.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Netherlands or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can DutchPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Dutch. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

DutchPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Dutch speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Dutch online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Dutch host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Dutch easily yet correctly, DutchPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Dutch need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Dutch

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At DutchPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Dutch Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How DutchPod101 Can Help You Learn Dutch Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Dutch


1. Why Is It Important to Know Dutch Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Dutch culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, DutchPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Netherlands.

Here are some of the most important Dutch vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Dutch Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
familie
Great grandfather
overgrootvader
Mother
moeder
Grandmother
grootmoeder
Father
vader
Grandfather
grootvader
Wife
vrouw
Grandchild
kleinkind
Husband
echtgenoot
Granddaughter
kleindochter
Parent
ouder
Grandson
kleinzoon
Child
kind
Aunt
tante
Daughter
dochter
Uncle
oom
Sister
zus
Niece
nicht
Brother
broer
Nephew
neef
Younger sister
jongere zus
Younger brother
jongere broer
Older brother
oudere broer
Great grandmother
overgrootmoeder
Cousin
nicht
Mother-in-law
schoonmoeder
Father-in-law
schoonvader
Sister-in-law
schoonzuster
Brother-in-law
zwager
Partner
partner

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Dutch Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Dutch language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Dutch literature, or make use of ours!

Je kiest je gezin niet zelf. Ze zijn Gods geschenk aan jou, als wat jij voor hen bent.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Familie is niet een belangrijk ding. Het is alles.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Familie betekent dat niemand wordt achtergelaten of vergeten.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Mijn familie is mijn kracht en mijn zwakte.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Het gezin is een van de meesterwerken van de natuur.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Wanneer er problemen komen , is het je familie die je steunt.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Het gezin is de eerste essentiële bouwsteen van de menselijke samenleving.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Er bestaat niet zoiets als plezier voor het hele gezin.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Je moet je eer verdedigen. En je familie.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Alle gelukkige gezinnen lijken op elkaar; elk ongelukkig gezin is ongelukkig op zijn eigen manier.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Dutch vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. familie a. My male child
2. moeder b. My older male sibling
3. vader c. My female sibling
4. vrouw d. My child’s child
5. echtgenoot e. My child’s female child
6. ouder f. My female parent
7. kind g. My grandparent’s mother
8. dochter h. Mother to one of my parents
9. zoon i. Relatives
10. zus j. My female child
11. broer k. My younger male sibling
12. jongere zus l. Male spouse
13. jongere broer m. The father of one of my parents
14. oudere broer n. My child’s male child
15. overgrootmoeder o. My children’s father or mother
16. overgrootvader p. The sister of one of my parents
17. grootmoeder q. The brother of one of my parents
18. grootvader r. My male parent
19. kleinkind s. My sibling’s female child
20. kleindochter t. My sibling’s male child
21. kleinzoon u. My male sibling
22. tante v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. oom w. Female spouse
24. nicht x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. neef y. The person I am a parent to
26. nicht z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at DutchPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How DutchPod101 Can Help You Learn Dutch Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Dutch vocabulary!

DutchPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Dutch easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Dutch culture, including the Dutch family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Dutch word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Dutch Key Phrase List
4 - A free Dutch online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Dutch Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Dutch language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, DutchPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Dutch mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Dutch

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

Sinterklaas Arrives: St. Nicholas’ Eve in the Netherlands

Each year on his birthday, Sinterklaas arrives in the Netherlands with his helpers and gives out candies and gifts to children who have been good. Saint Nicholas Eve, the night before St. Nicholas Day, is also a time of gift-giving and pleasant surprises among adults, in honor of the real saint this holiday is based on.

In this article, you’ll learn about how the Dutch celebrate Sinterklaas and about the traditional Sinterklaas stories.

Ready? Let’s get started!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Dutch

1. What is St. Nicholas’ Eve?

St. Nicholas Eve is the night before Sinterklaas and the Saint’s birthday. On this night, Saint Nicholas arrives in the Netherlands with presents. Although most Dutch people have grown up with this celebration, for most non-Dutch people this holy man is an entirely unfamiliar phenomenon. So let’s get to know him!

The Saint and his helpers arrive in the Netherlands from Spain around mid-November. From then on, children get to place their shoes next to the hearth before they go to bed so that Saint Nicholas’ helpers (known as Black Peters) can put a small gift in them (for example, a chocolate letter).

Black Peter is Sinterklaas’ helper. Many children love the “Peters” because they like to be mischievous; they dance comically and throw candies around for the children to pick up. They climb on rooftops and come down the chimney at night to put a little gift in the children’s waiting shoes. Of course, this is only for children who have been good all year. Children who’ve been bad are put in the sack and taken back to Spain.

In Holland, the name of Sinterklaas’ horse is Amerigo. We also know him as a grey. But in Flanders, the name of Sinterklaas’ horse is Bad-Weather-Today!

2. When is St. Nicholas’ Eve?

December 5

Each year, the Dutch celebrate St. Nicholas’ Eve on December 5.

3. Saint Nicholas Eve Celebrations

Chocolate Letters

All the children sing special Sinterklaas songs for Saint Nicholas and his “Peters” as they put their shoes out. They also watch the Sinterklaas News daily on national television to stay informed about their activities.

Adults also celebrate by exchanging gifts on behalf of the Saint during Sinterklaas parties. These are usually accompanied by a special little Sinterklaas-themed rhyming poem—a kind of limerick—and are wrapped similarly to how Christmas gifts in the United States are. Family members and friends often draw names to know who to prepare a surprise for. The surprise element here is far more important than the actual gift-giving!

The Dutch also do plenty of feasting and drink lots of hot chocolate in celebration of the life of the real St. Nicholas, who was known for giving gifts to children.

4. Where was Sinterklaas Born?

Do you know where the good Saint originally came from, according to history books?

About 1700 years ago, Sinterklaas was born in the town of Patara (present-day Turkey), and not in Spain as most Dutch people think. The location of the Saint’s headquarters is top-secret, of course.

If you’ve been bad this year and he takes you back with him in the sack, the question is whether you’ll end up in Spain or in Turkey!

5. Essential St. Nicholas’ Eve Vocabulary

Saint Nicholas

Here’s some Dutch vocabulary for you to memorize before St. Nicholas’ Eve!

  • Wortel — “Carrot”
  • Maan — “Moon”
  • Schoorsteen — “Chimney”
  • Pepernoot — “Spice nut”
  • Speculaas — “Ginger cookie”
  • Chocoladeletter — “Chocolate letter”
  • Zwarte Piet — “Black Pete”
  • Sinterklaas — “Saint Nicholas”
  • Pakje — “Present”
  • Amerigo — “Amerigo”
  • Mijter — “Mitre”
  • Vijf december — “December 5″
  • Roe — “Birch rod”
  • Sinterklaasfeest — “Saint Nicholas Day”

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and to read them alongside relevant images, check out our Dutch St. Nicholas’ Eve vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

What are your thoughts on the Dutch Sinterklaas celebrations? I think we can all agree that a holiday involving gifts, singing, and hot chocolate is a good one. ;)

This holiday doesn’t even scratch the surface of Dutch culture and traditions, though. If you want to learn even more about the Netherlands and the Dutch people, or perhaps some more vocabulary for the winter, DutchPod101.com has plenty of fun and informative sources for you to check out:

At DutchPod101.com, learning Dutch doesn’t have to be a boring or overwhelming process. We do everything we can to make it as painless and fun as possible!

If you’re serious about mastering the Dutch language, create your free lifetime account today!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Dutch

Why Should You Learn Dutch?

We want you to speak Dutch, you want to know why? Here is why, learning Dutch is easy! Because English and Dutch are related languages. Also, Speaking Dutch will make you popular around the Dutchies they will love you, seriously they will. When you speak Dutch you can get into “gezelligheid” (explanation down below).

In addition, You’ll have 23 million native Dutch speakers to talk to. Located all around the world. They speak Dutch in Belgium, Surinam (South America) and The Carribean.

Here is why.

1. Dutch is easy to learn

I love Holland!

Do you already know English? Good, the leap from English to Dutch is small as both languages belong to the West Germanic family. When 2 languages belong to the same family it easier for you to pick up, because:

  • They share a similar sentence structure.
  • Dutch uses many loanwords from English.
  • They share a similar sound system.
  • Dutch tend to have the same verb conjugations.

Smooth sailing thanks to those similarities! To make it even easier DutchPod101 provides a clear pathway for you to learn Dutch. From beginners to advanced levels.

2. Find your dream job

Resume

Looking for a job in cheese welding, wooden shoemaking or operating a Windmill? Just kidding ;).

There are loads of opportunities in this small country. The Netherlands is the 7th biggest economy of the European Union. With Schiphol being one of the busiest airports in the world While Rotterdam having the biggest port of Europe. In other words, enough job opportunities for you!

Speaking Dutch as a second language is a huge advantage. It gives you an edge over other applicants. Even for the English speaking roles, stand out by having some Dutch small talk with your future boss. Or use Dutchpod101 to avoid those awkward silences while meeting your Dutch coworkers at the coffee machines.

3. Dutchies will love you

Girls Talking

Do you know how awesome it is to have a foreign friend that speaks your mother tongue? As a Dutchy myself, I can tell you, it’s pretty awesome. Having someone taking the time and the interest to learn the Dutch language is highly appreciated. Many foreigners do not bother because they tell you that is not a necessity. You could survive without Dutch just in Amsterdam. But I promise you, that you will miss out on so many good things. Because the main language of the local events is in Dutch. When you speak Dutch it will get easier to invite you to our local birthday parties, baby showers, housewarmings.

It is just like Nelson Mandela said: If you talk to a man in a language he understands you talk to his brain. If you talk to him in its own language you will talk to his heart. This may sound cheesy but it is true.

By learning Dutch you will break the ex-pat/foreigner bubble and integrate more in society. Try to speak Dutch as much as you can. You know how the Dutchies speaking English as second nature. Don’t buy into that they love talking their mother tong. Always start off speaking Dutch first. Then make clear to your (future) Dutch friends that you want to speak Dutch. Is the topic getting too complicated? Don’t worry you can always switch back to English. Getting into that habit of starting off a conversation in Dutch is key to master the language. Break that bubble and become a Dutchie!

4. Making Dutch friends

Making Friends

Speaking the Dutch language makes it easier to have local Dutch friends. Your local Dutch friend will take you to undiscovered spots where you won’t find any foreigners. Be ready to get invited to Dutch parties and “Borrels”. Celebrate “prinsjesdag” and “Koningsdag” while singing along with Dutch songs. Go all out with your Dutch friends on New Years’ Eve while wishing everyone a happy new year in Dutch. Having local friends as a foreigner in the Netherlands will boost your social circle. And a place to celebrate the different Dutch holidays throughout the year.

5. Get into “gezelligheid”

Cozy

Impress your Dutch friends while having a drink and eating some “Bitterballen”. With the Dutch you have learned from DutchPod101. Don’t miss out on Dutch jokes because now you get what they are talking about. But what does “gezelligheid” really mean? Imagine you’re sitting around a fire during a cold winter night with your friends. Everything is good, you’re sharing stories, laughing while sipping on hot cocoa. What would you call that feeling? That cozy feeling what you get is what we call “gezelligheid” and you will hear it all the time while being in the Netherlands.

6. How Dutchpod101 can help you?

DutchPod101

For more than 10 years, DutchPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Dutch by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Dutch fast using our proven system:

  • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Dutch Instructors: DutchPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Dutch vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Dutch and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
  • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
  • 2000 Common Dutch Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

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DutchPod101’s Essential Dutch Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Netherlands. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at DutchPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Dutch travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Dutch friends or travel guide with your flawless Dutch!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. DutchPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Dutch people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Dutch phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Dutch. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Netherlands will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Dutch.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Dutch, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Dank je wel (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Dutch.

2) Spreekt u Engels? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Gaat er een bus vanaf het vliegveld naar de stad? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Is dit de juiste bus naar de luchthaven? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Pardon, hoeveel is de ritprijs? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Ik heb gereserveerd (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Heeft u voor vanavond nog iets vrij? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Waar is het treinstation? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Ik ben allergisch voor pinda’s (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Dutch.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Dutch on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Dutch if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Heeft u ook vegetarische gerechten? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Dutch.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Kan ik een plattegrond krijgen? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Hoeveel kost dit? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Dutch will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Accepteert u ook creditcards? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Is de Wi-Fi gratis? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Mogen wij misschien de menukaart? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Wat raadt u mij aan? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Dutch friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Ik wil graag een rookvrije plaats hebben, alstublieft (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Water alstublieft (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Mag ik de rekening? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Wat raadt u voor een souvenir aan? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. DutchPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Dutch? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

DutchPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Dutch reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Dutch word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Dutch Key Phrase List
- A free Dutch online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Dutch Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Dutch-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Dutch speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Dutch friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With DutchPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Dutch Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Netherlands, using the correct Dutch numbers for counting in Dutch could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Dutch Numbers?
  3. Learning Dutch Numbers
  4. Why Choose DutchPod101 to Learn all about Dutch Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Dutch


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Dutch Numbers?

For us at DutchPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Netherlands or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Dutch Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Dutch number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Dutch numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Dutch numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Dutch speaker and friendly DutchPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Dutch numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Dutch number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Dutch words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose DutchPod101 to Learn all about Dutch Numbers?

DutchPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! DutchPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Dutch!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Dutch with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Dutch dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about DutchPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Dutch teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Dutch word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Dutch level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with DutchPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Dutch numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Dutch

How To Post In Perfect Dutch on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Dutch, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Dutch.

At Learn Dutch, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Dutch in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Dutch

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Dutch

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Dutch. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Jan eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Jan’s post.

Uit eten met de mannen!
“Out for dinner with the guys!”

1- uit eten

First is an expression meaning “dining out.”
Thursdays and Fridays are especially popular to go out for dinner in the Netherlands. A word often related to food is “lekker,” which can be translated as “tasty” or “delicious.” In Dutch the verb “to eat” and the noun “food” are the same word: “eten”. It depends on the context and the sentence whether it is a verb or a noun.

2- met de mannen

Then comes the phrase - “with the guys.”
Note that this is only applicable to a group of guys. If you have a group of girls you would say “met de meiden,” which means “with the girls”. If the group is mixed you could say “met zijn allen,” which means “with all of us.”

COMMENTS

In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

1- Gezellig! Veel plezier!

His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Fun! Enjoy yourselves!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted towards the poster and wish him well.

2- Niet te veel eten.

His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t eat too much.”
Use this expression to admonish the poster to not overeat. Could be meant in a joking, teasing way, or it could be meant seriously. However, unless you know the poster well and has a very comfortable relationship, it’s seldom a good idea to instruct people on social media like they’re your children or inferiors!

3- Dat wordt genieten!

His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “It will be delicious!”
Use this expression if you want to comment on what the food looks like to you.

4- Eet smakelijk!

His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Bon appetit!”
This is a French loan-expression that roughly means: “Eat well!”

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mannen: “men”
  • gezellig: “fun (in social event)”
  • eten: “to eat”
  • genieten: “to enjoy”
  • smakelijk: “tasty”
  • plezier: “pleasure”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Dutch restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Dutch

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Dutch phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Sanne shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wij zijn even winkelen.
    “We’re out (for) shopping.”

    1- wij zijn

    First is an expression meaning “we are.”
    Dutch people like shopping. This is done alone, with family or with friends. In the big cities, there are various shopping centers to go to. The local markets are also very popular, and you can find anything you want here: clothes, fish stands, groceries, sweets, etc. Dutch people also like to make a quick trip to Belgium or Germany for some shopping.

    2- winkelen

    Then comes the phrase - “go shopping.”
    In most of the bigger cities, you will find that shops are open during the week, including Sundays. In the smaller cities, shops are open only one Sunday per month. Most shops are open from 9am to 5pm or 6pm, and they are also open at least one evening per week. Of course, supermarkets are open longer.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Geld moet rollen!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Money must flow!”
    Use this expression to make a joking comment on the poster’s apparent riches.

    2- Laat zien wat je hebt gekocht!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Show us what you bought!”
    Use this expression to show you curious about the poster’s purchases. A good conversation starter.

    3- Ik ben blij dat ik niet mee hoef.

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad I didn’t have to join”
    Use this expression when you’re not fond of shopping. Usually said in a joking, teasing manner.

    4- Wat leuk! Veel plezier, dames!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “How nice! Have fun, ladies!”
    Use this expression to wish someone a good time shopping.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • winkelen: “to shop”
  • geld: “money”
  • zien: “to see”
  • blij: “happy”
  • leuk: “nice”
  • veel: “many”
  • dames: “ladies”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Dutch

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Dutch.

    Jan plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team on the beach, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Wie gaat er mee volleyballen op het strand?
    “Who wants to go play volleyball on the beach?”

    1- wie gaat er mee volleyballen

    First is an expression meaning “who wants to go play volleyball.”
    Volleyball is a popular sport in the Netherlands. Everyone likes to play volleyball from time to time, both indoor and outdoor. Beach volleyball is played in the summertime on various beaches, and you can even join small tournaments with your friends.

    2- op het strand

    Then comes the phrase - “on the beach.”
    The Netherlands has lovely sandy beaches all along the west coast. They are far from tropical (no clear blue water), but the sand is nice. During the year there are a lot of surfers, and during the summer there are a lot of beach clubs along the water. Throughout the year it is nice to have a stroll down the beach, and in the summer, when the weather is nice, you can go swimming. Also, every night you can enjoy a beautiful sunset.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik heb al genoeg gesport vandaag.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “I already worked out enough for today.”
    Use this expression to explain that you’ve done a lot of exercise already, which is why you cannot join the game.

    2- Volgende keer ben ik er weer bij.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be there again next time.”
    Use this expression to state you intention to join in the teamsport next time.

    3- Ik wil mee!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I want to join!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling eager to join the team.

    4- Het weer is geweldig!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “The weather is amazing!”
    Use this expression just to make conversation by adding a positive comment about the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strand: “beach”
  • genoeg: “enough”
  • volgende: “next”
  • keer: “time”
  • weer: “weather”
  • geweldig: “amazing”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Dutch

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Sanne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Leuk nummer dit! Gisteren gehoord op een feestje.
    “This is a great song! I heard it at a party yesterday.”

    1- Leuk nummer dit!

    First is an expression meaning “This is a great song!.”
    The Dutch word “nummer” can refer to a song, but it also means “number.”

    2- Gisteren gehoord op een feestje.

    Then comes the phrase - “I heard it at a party yesterday..”
    In the Netherlands, Thursdays are mostly student nights for partying or going out. Fridays are great for an after-work drink, followed by a party. Both Fridays and Saturdays are great for clubbing. In the summer there are a lot of outdoor festivals, both in Belgium and the Netherlands, even if the weather is not great.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lekker dansnummertje.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Great song to dance to.”
    Use this expression to share your opinion that you consider the song great to dance to.

    2- Ik ken deze al 2 maanden.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “I’ve known this already for two months.”
    Use this expression to brag a bit that the song is old news for you.

    3- Was het een leuk feestje?

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Was it a nice party?”
    Use this expression to show you are curious about the poster’s party, and want to know more.

    4- Super! Fijne beat.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Great! Nice beat.”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster, and think that the song has a good rhythm or percussion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nummer: “song”
  • goed: “good”
  • maand: “month”
  • feestje: “party”
  • dans: “dance”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Dutch Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Dutch!

    Jan goes to a DJ concert, posts an image of of the DJ at work, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    De sfeer zit er goed in! Wat een artiest!
    “Amazing atmosphere! What an artist!”

    1- De sfeer zit er goed in!

    First is an expression meaning “Amazing atmosphere!.”
    You can use this sentence in all kinds of social contexts: parties, concerts, dinners, events, meetings. It is sometimes used sarcastically to mean that the atmosphere is not so great.

    2- Wat een artiest!

    Then comes the phrase - “What an artist!.”
    There are a lot of well known Dutch DJs, such as DJ Tiesto, Armin van Buuren, Hardwell and Martin Garrix.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik was daar ook! Heb je niet gezien.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I was there too! I didn’t see you.”
    Use this expression to make conversation about a shared experience, or to joke a bit. Very often, these concerts are attended by thousands, so missing a person you know is easy.

    2- Kippenvel! Zo mooi!

    His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Goosebumps! Really beautiful!”
    Use this phrase to express how positively you experience the song.

    3- Wat bijzonder!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “How special!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that the song they posted is unique.

    4- Ik heb het album. Prachtige muziek.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I have the album. Beautiful music.”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that the artist is good, cause you have the album.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sfeer: “atmosphere”
  • daar: “there”
  • kippenvel: “goosebumps”
  • bijzonder: “special”
  • prachtig: “wonderful”
  • muziek: “music”
  • artiest: “artist”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Dutch

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Dutch phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Sanne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik ben even niet bereikbaar. Mijn telefoon is kapot!
    “I’m unreachable. My phone is broken!”

    1- Ik ben even niet bereikbaar

    First is an expression meaning “I’m not reachable..”
    You can also use this sentence for your voicemail or when you are on holiday and can’t be reached.

    ‘Bereikbaar’ means reachable or available. It can also be used for a location, as in: “This place is hard to reach.” In Dutch, “Deze plek is moeilijk bereikbaar”

    2- Mijn telefoon is kapot

    Then comes the phrase - “My phone is broken!.”
    If you have some issues with your mobile phone, you could take it to one of the many small mobile phone repair shops. To replace a screen or camera, get a new charger or to have your phone made sim-free, this is the place to go if you don’t want to wait a long time at a bigger shop, or spend a lot of money on repair costs.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Het komt goed.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll be alright.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging.

    2- Ik stuur wel een kaartje.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll send a postcard instead.”
    Use this expression when you’re feeling humorous and want to joke with the poster about their status of unreachability.

    3- Wat een drama!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “What a drama!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that losing a phone (or something else) is a big deal.

    4- Dat ziet er niet goed uit.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “That doesn’t look good.”
    Use this expression to show the poster that losing something important isn’t good, almost the same as sympathizing with them.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • telefoon: “phone”
  • komen: “to come”
  • kaartje: “postcard, entrance ticket”
  • drama: “drama”
  • kapot: “broken”
  • bereikbaar: “reachable, available”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in Dutch. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Dutch

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Dutch!

    Jan gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Ik verveel me. Iemand nog tips?
    “I’m bored. Anyone have any tips?”

    1- Ik verveel me

    First is an expression meaning “I’m bored.”
    Fun fact: in Dutch “bored” is a verb. No need to add “I am (bored)”. Bored is considered a verb in itself.

    2- Iemand nog tips?

    Then comes the phrase - “Anyone have any tips?.”
    This sentence is great to ask for tips and advice on social media. You can use it for anything. Maybe you are planning a trip and you want tips, or you have a problem and you want some advice. Just state what you want tips about, for example, “Weekend trip to Amsterdam,” and then say ‘iemand nog tips?’

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Het huis schoonmaken misschien?

    His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Clean the house, maybe?”
    Use this expression as a suggestion to while away time, thus alleviating boredom. This is probably meant in a joking manner.

    2- Buiten een wandeling maken.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Take a walk outside.”
    This is another suggestion to relieve boredom.

    3- Kom gezellig koffie drinken!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Come by for coffee!”
    This is an invitation for coffee; in this context, it is meant to alleviate boredom.

    4- Wil je voetballen?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna play soccer?”
    Another invitation to help the poster deal with the extra time on hand.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tips: “recommendation”
  • huis: “house”
  • wandelen: “to take a walk”
  • koffie: “coffee”
  • voetballen: “to play a soccer”
  • buiten: “outside”
  • iemand: “anyone”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Dutch

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Dutch about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Sanne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een dag! Ik kan wel een week slapen.
    “What a day! I can sleep for an entire week.”

    1- Wat een dag!

    First is an expression meaning “What a day!.”
    “wat een dag” - “what a day” you can use this sentence in all sorts of contexts, both positive and negative. Use it when you had a rough day, a great day, if something really particular happened, or when you are really tired.

    2- Ik kan wel een week slapen.

    Then comes the phrase - “I can sleep for an entire week..”
    Dutch and Belgian office hours usually run from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm with a 30 minute to 1 hour lunch break between 12:00 and 1pm.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ga lekker vroeg naar bed vanavond.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Go to bed early tonight.”
    Use this phrase if you mean to give the poster advice about their sleeping habits.

    2- Morgen weer een nieuwe dag!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Tomorrow’s another day!”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging, reminding them, in a way, that their fatigue will pass.

    3- Zet hem op!

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “You can do this!”
    Use this expression to be encouraging and positive.

    4- Het zijn drukke tijden.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “These are busy times.”
    This is a somewhat laconic statement, employed to be part of the conversation by stating the obvious.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • dag: “day”
  • bed: “bed”
  • morgen: “tomorrow”
  • nieuw: “new”
  • druk: “busy”
  • week: “week”
  • slapen: “to sleep”
  • tijd: “time”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Dutch! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Dutch

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Dutch.

    Jan suffers a painful knee injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Nou, even geen sport voor mij… Heb mijn knie verdraaid.
    “Well, no sports for me for now… Twisted my knee.”

    1- Nou, even geen sport voor mij…

    First is an expression meaning “Well, no sports for me for now….”
    “Nou” can’t be literally translated in English. It means something like “well” and is often used in a somewhat cynical context.

    2- Heb mijn knie verdraaid.

    Then comes the phrase - “Got my knee twisted..”
    On social media most posts are about yourself. So people often leave out the personal pronoun “I” = “ik”. Normally, you always need a personal pronoun before or after the verb in Dutch. But in written language, when a sentence is about yourself and the setting is informal like social media, you can start straight away with the verb, without the personal pronoun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik hoop dat het snel beter gaat.

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “I hope it will get better soon.”
    Use this expression to show that you are encouraging and wish the poster well.

    2- Wat is er gebeurd?

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Ask this question if you are curious about the details regarding the injury. Questions are a great way to keep a conversation going.

    3- Beterschap.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Get well.”
    Use this short expression to demonstrate goodwill and wish the poster a speedy recovery.

    4- Dus je gaat niet mee zaterdag?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “So you’re not coming Saturday?”
    This question is also asking for more details, as the poster’s injury clearly has implications.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • knie: “knee”
  • beter: “better”
  • wat: “what”
  • beterschap: “get well soon”
  • zaterdag: “Saturday”
  • even: “temporarily, for the time being”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Dutch

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Sanne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een rotweer!
    “Such horrible weather!”

    1- wat een

    First is an expression meaning “such a.”
    The weather is probably the most favorite subject of discussion for the Dutch. It is often raining and people love to complain about it. Also, when the weather is great, people will often use this as a casual conversation starter. There is always something to say about the weather.

    2- rotweer

    Then comes the phrase - “horrible weather.”
    Because there is so much rain in the Netherlands, people are used to it. They will still go out to ride their bikes, and there is plenty to do and see indoors, like visiting nice museums.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Goed weer om binnen te blijven.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Great weather to stay inside.”
    Use this expression to put a positive spin on the situation.

    2- Hier schijnt de zon.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Here, the sun is shining.”
    Use this expression to share information and make conversation.

    3- Morgen zou het beter worden.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “It should be better tomorrow.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging by pointing out the positive.

    4- Wil je naar de bios?

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna go to the movies?”
    Use this question to make a suggestion that will distract the poster’s attention from the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • weer: “weather”
  • binnen: “inside”
  • zon: “sun”
  • hier: “here”
  • bios: “cinema (slang)”
  • How would you comment in Dutch when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though! Why not talk about romance? That will lift anyone’s mood!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Dutch

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Jan changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Sanne together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Heel blij met deze dame.
    “Very happy with this lady.”

    1- heel blij

    First is an expression meaning “very happy.”
    When making a happy announcement, like a promotion, engagement, marriage, or birthday, it is customary to congratulate someone by saying: ‘Gefeliciteerd!’ (English: “Congratulations!” )

    2- met deze dame

    Then comes the phrase - “with this lady.”
    You could also wish the couple well by saying: ‘Veel geluk samen!’, which is - “Much happiness together!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gefeliciteerd!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    As said, this is the traditional way to congratulate anyone on positive news.

    2- Geweldig nieuws!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Great news!”
    Use this expression if you want to make it clear that you really good about the news.

    3- Veel geluk samen.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Much happiness together!”
    As said, this is another traditional way to congratulate specifically a couple on their relationship.

    4- Ik wil haar graag ontmoeten.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I would love to meet her.”
    This phrase indicates that you have not met the poster’s belle yet, but feel positive about the prospect.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • dame: “lady”
  • gefeliciteerd: “congratulations”
  • nieuws: “news”
  • geluk: “luck”
  • ontmoeten: “to meet”
  • blij: “happy”
  • samen: “together”
  • haar: “her”
  • What would you say in Dutch when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Dutch

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Dutch.

    Sanne is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Vandaag geef ik jou het ja-woord. Dit is de mooiste dag van mijn leven!
    “Today, I give you my vows. The most beautiful day of my life!”

    1- Vandaag geef ik jou het ja-woord

    First is an expression meaning “Today I give you my vows. .”
    Instead of just “I do” to confirm your wedding vows, the Dutch say “yes, I do”. Therefore, they say, “het ja-woord,” which literally means “the yes word.”

    2- De mooiste dag van mijn leven

    Then comes the phrase - “The most beautiful day of my life!.”
    Weddings in the Netherlands only last one day. It is usually a ceremony followed by a reception with a cake and some dancing. Sometimes, dinner is also offered, but this is usually only for a small group of close family and friends.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jullie zijn een prachtig stel!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “You’re a wonderful couple!”
    Use this expression when you feel really good about this match, and compliment the couple on it.

    2- Een prachtige dag voor een bruiloft. Gefeliciteerd!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “A beautiful day for a wedding. Congrats! ”
    Use this expression when you feel the weather is playing with for a beautiful wedding. You also congratulate the couple.

    3- Je bent de mooiste bruid!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “You’re the most beautiful bride!”
    Use this expression to compliment the bride on looking stunning.

    4- Gefeliciteerd. Veel geluk samen.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations. Much happiness together.”
    This is an old-fashioned or traditional congratulatory wish for newly-weds.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vandaag: “today”
  • stel: “couple”
  • bruiloft: “wedding”
  • bruid: “bride”
  • feliciteren: “to congratulate”
  • mooi: “beautiful”
  • dag: “day”
  • How would you respond in Dutch to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Dutch

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Dutch.

    Jan finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Het is officieel. We krijgen een kleine!
    “It’s official. We’re having a little one!”

    1- Het is officieel!

    First is an expression meaning “It’s official! .”
    You can use this expression for any big reveal: having a baby, announcing a new job, arranging travel plans, getting your diploma, etc.

    2- We krijgen een kleine!

    Then comes the phrase - “We are getting a little one!.”
    It is custom in the Netherlands for the name of the baby to be revealed only after the baby is born. After the baby’s arrival, all the friends and family receive a postcard with the name of the baby, the time it was born, and more info about if and when you can visit.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gefeliciteerd!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the customary, traditional short way to congratulate anyone on a big, positive happening in their lives.

    2- Krijg ik een neefje of een nichtje?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Will I get a nephew or a niece?”
    This questions shows that you are curious about the gender of the baby. Questions are good conversation starters.

    3- Gefeliciteerd! Wat een geweldig nieuws!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! What great news!”
    This is another positive and enthusiastic way to congratulate anyone on a happy announcement.

    4- Jullie eerste kindje! Gefeliciteerd!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Your first baby! Congratulations!”
    These phrases combine the traditional congratulations and an exclamation that states an obvious fact. Yet, the latter emphasizes obvious enthusiasm and happiness about the announcement.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • klein: “little”
  • krijgen: “to get”
  • neef: “nephew, cousin”
  • nicht: “niece, cousin”
  • kind: “child”
  • eerste: “first”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Dutch Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Dutch.

    Sanne plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een schatje! Net als haar vader.
    “What a sweetheart! Just like her father.”

    1- Wat een schatje!

    First is an expression meaning “What a sweetheart!.”
    “schatje”= sweetheart is an expression you would only use for your partner, your child or a person/child very close to you.

    2- Net als haar vader.

    Then comes the phrase - “Just like her father..”
    “net als” is used to compare one thing with another. In this example, Sanne thinks the baby is as cute as its father. Aside from using this expression with people, it can also be used for objects or places. For instance: “De zee is blauw hier, net als tuis”, which means: “The sea is blue here, just like at home”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ze groeit zo snel.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “She is growing so quickly”
    This is a positive comment pertaining to the baby’s development, a pretty standard one in most languages. It’s a way to partake in the conversation.

    2- Net als haar moeder!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Just like her mom!”
    Use this expression to compliment the mother.

    3- Ze lijkt meer op jou.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “She looks more like you.”
    Use this expression if you want to emphasize the similarity between the poster and the baby.

    4- Zo lief! Ik kom snel weer langs.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “So cute! I will pass by again soon.”
    These phrases expresses admiration for the baby, and announces that you will visit the family at home soon.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • schatje: “cutie”
  • snel: “quick”
  • moeder: “mother”
  • lijken: “to seem”
  • lief: “cute”
  • vader: “father”
  • If your friend is a mother or father showing off their cutie pie, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Dutch! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Dutch Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Jan goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    De hele familie bij elkaar, gezellig!
    “The whole family together, fun!”

    1- de hele familie bij elkaar

    First is an expression meaning “the whole family together.”
    “fam” is short for “familie”. This includes your direct family (Mom, Dad, and siblings), as well as your aunts, uncles, grandmas, grandpas, cousins and nephews.

    In Dutch there is no linguistic distinction between nephew and cousin, both mean ‘neef’. Same for niece and cousin; they both are called ‘nicht’ in Dutch.

    2- gezellig

    Then comes the phrase - “fun.”
    Family reunions in the Netherlands are very different depending on the family. In general, the most important family events of the year are birthday parties. These are celebrated with the whole family, as well as friends and neighbors. It doesn’t matter where you live in the Netherlands, if there is a birthday party, people will make an effort to enjoy the day with friends and family.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Wat een grote familie!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Such a big family!”
    Use this expression to comment on the size of the family. A good one to post if you’re not part of the poster’s family, or if you don’t know them well.

    2- Dit is zo saai.

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “This is so boring.”
    This is a personal opinion about family gatherings, and not a positive one.

    3- Ziet er gezellig uit!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Looks very cozy!”
    Use this expression if you feel the family members look comfortable and relatively happy together.

    4- Het was een hele leuke dag. Bedankt allemaal!

    His wife, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “It was a great day. Thanks, everyone!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful for a day that went well. It can be used as is for any type of day, not only a family gathering.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • familie: “family”
  • groot: “big”
  • saai: “boring”
  • zien: “to see”
  • bedankt: “thanks”
  • allemaal: “everyone”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Dutch

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Dutch about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Sanne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik kan niet wachten! Zon, zee, strand, ik kom eraan!
    “I can’t wait! Sun, sea, beach, here I come!”

    1- Ik kan niet wachten!

    First is an expression meaning “I can’t wait!”
    You can use this sentence for any situation you anticipate with a lot of excitement.

    2- Zon, zee, strand, ik kom eraan!

    Then comes the phrase - “Sun, sea, beach, here I come!”
    As the weather is usually not great in the Netherlands, people love to go on holidays to warmer places like the south of Europe, Turkey or Egypt.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lekker! Geniet ervan!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful! Enjoy it!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling excited for the poster and wish them well.

    2- Fijne vakantie!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Happy holidays!”
    This phrase is an old-fashioned but often used to wish someone a good experience during the holidays.

    3- Niet te bruin worden hoor.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t get tanned too much.”
    This is an admonition for the poster to not stay in the sun for too long. Everyone knows the perils of sunburn, so this is just a reminder.

    4- Goede vlucht!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Nice flight!”
    Use this expression to wish the holiday-goers a pleasant flight to their destination.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wachten: “to wait”
  • kunnen: “to be able”
  • vakantie: “holiday”
  • niet: “not”
  • goed: “good”
  • vlucht: “flight”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Dutch!

    Hopefully the trip is great!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Dutch

    So maybe you’re strolling around at the local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Dutch phrases to use to share your experiences!

    Jan finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Wat een vondst! Misschien is het wel een miljoen waard!
    “Look what I found! Maybe it’s worth a million!”

    1- Wat een vondst!

    First is an expression meaning “Look what I found!.”
    “een vondst” is a find, a treasure. You can use it for an object but also for a place, like a really nice restaurant you found and want to share with your friends on social media. For this, you can use the sentence “wat een vondst!”

    2- Misschien is het wel een miljoen waard!

    Then comes the phrase - “Maybe it’s worth a million!.”
    In the Netherlands it is not common to haggle in shops. At local markets it is a bit more common, but for stalls selling vintage items it is usually acceptable. The rule-of-thumb is that when items have a label with a price on it, there is very little opportunity for haggling.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Heel bijzonder!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Very special!”
    Use this expression just to leave a comment and be part of the conversation. You agree with the poster that the find is unusual.

    2- Wat is het?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “What is it?”
    Ask this question to show you are interested in the topic, and would like to know more details.

    3- Misschien word je wel rijk!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Maybe you’ll be rich!”
    Share this opinion if you think the find may be worth something.

    4- Waar was dit?

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Where was this?”
    This is another question after more details, and a good way to oil the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • misschien: “maybe”
  • bijzonder: “particular”
  • heel: “very”
  • rijk: “rich”
  • waar: “where”
  • dit: “this”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Dutch

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Dutch, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Sanne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Er gaat niks boven de Amsterdamse grachten!
    “Nothing beats the Amsterdam canals!”

    1- er gaat niks boven

    First is an expression meaning “nothing beats”.
    Literally translated this sentence means “there is nothing above”. You can use this when you really like or enjoy something: ‘Er gaat niks boven een koud biertje’, which means, “Nothing beats a cold beer”. Or: “Er gaat niks boven mama’s zelfgemaakte pannekoeken’, which means, “Nothing beats mom’s homemade pancakes”.

    2- de Amsterdamse grachten

    Then comes the phrase - “the Amsterdam canals.”
    Amsterdam has three major canals that form the historic centre. There are many other canals in the city, as well as two major rivers. One of those is Amsterdam’s access point to the North sea.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik ken nog een leuk lunchtentje, zit daar om de hoek

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “I know a lovely place to have lunch, just around the corner from there.”
    This comment shares a personal detail, demonstrating knowledge of the topic of discussion, and is a good way to stay part of the conversation.

    2- Niet voor mij, veel te druk.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Not for me, way too busy.”
    Use this expression to share your opinion about a destination.

    3- Heerlijke stad!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful city!”
    This expression is the opposite of the previous, negative one.

    4- Ik ga er binnenkort heen! Heb je nog tips?

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I will go there soon! Any tips?”
    Use these phrases to indicate your intention to also visit the destination under discussion. You also ask for tips from friends about this destination.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • gracht: “canal”
  • hoek: “corner”
  • mij: “me”
  • stad: “city”
  • gaan: “to go”
  • hebben: “to have”
  • niks: “nothing”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Dutch

    So you’re doing nothing, yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Dutch!

    Jan enjoys himself at a beautiful place, posts an image of him relaxing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Koud biertje erbij. Ik ga nergens heen.
    “Cold drink in my hand. I’m not going anywhere.”

    1- Koud biertje erbij.

    First is an expression meaning “Cold drink in my hand..”
    The Dutch word “erbij” is not directly translatable in English. It is more of an informal slang word. It could be used in the context of an object that you are holding, like food or drinks as in this example. But it can also be used in a question form to ask if someone wants this particular food/drink item. For instance: “Biertje erbij?”, meaning “Would you like a beer with that?”

    2- Ik ga nergens heen.

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m not going anywhere…”
    Literally translated, this means “I’m going nowhere.” You can use this when you really like a place or situation (like a holiday, party, event or festival) and you want to stay there.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik kom eraan gast.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I’m on my way, dude.”
    Use this expression to show you’re very keen to join the poster, wherever they are. This is meant to be a joke, unless you have an actual arrangement to meet, of course.

    2- Ziet er goed uit!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Looks great!”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation by exclaiming that the poster looks really good.

    3- Waar is dit ook alweer?

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Where is this again?”
    Use this question to find out more details about the poster’s destination.

    4- Hoor jij niet op het werk te zijn?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Shouldn’t you be at work?”
    This question is probably meant as a joke, just to be part of the discussion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bier: “beer”
  • nergens: “nowhere”
  • helemaal: “completely”
  • gast: “dude”
  • waar: “where”
  • werken: “to work”
  • ook alweer: “again”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Dutch When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Sanne returns home after a vacation, but posts an image of their holiday home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik mis dit nu al! Zullen we nog een weekje gaan?
    “I miss this already! Let’s go for another week, agree?”

    1- Ik mis dit nu al!

    First is an expression meaning “I miss this already!”
    You can use the phrase ‘Ik mis’, which means “I miss” for many things: a person, a situation, a job, the sun, etc. If you miss someone and you want to tell them you can say ‘Ik mis jou’ (”I miss you” ). “Ik mis” can be followed by any verb or article plus noun.

    2- Zullen we nog een weekje gaan?

    Then comes the phrase - “Let’s go for another week?”
    “Weekje” is the diminutive of “week,” which also means “week” in English. By placing “je” or “tje” behind a noun you turn a word into the diminutive form in Dutch. For example: ‘dagje’ (”little day” ) or ‘fototje’ (”little photo” ). It is a way of expressing positive feelings about the subject under discussion, and a typically Dutch way of talking.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik wil foto’s zien!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I want to see the pictures!”
    Use this expression when you are keen to see the photos of the holiday.

    2- Ik kom morgen langs en wil al je verhalen horen.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “I will come by tomorrow and listen to your stories.”
    Use this expression to invite yourself over for a catch-up with the family.

    3- Waar ben je geweest?

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Where have you been?”
    This is a question to ask for more details about the destination of the holiday.

    4- Ik ben blij dat je het leuk hebt gehad.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you enjoyed it.”
    This is a friendly expression of gratitude for the family’s sake, and a positive way to add to the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • terug: “back”
  • foto: “photo”
  • verhalen: “stories”
  • zijn: “to be”
  • blij: “happy”
  • langskomen: “to come by, to visit”
  • horen: “to hear”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as King’s Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Dutch

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Jan plans to partake in a King’s Day festival or party, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Koningsdag! Dat wordt weer een mooi feestje!
    “King’s Day! That’s going to be a great party again!”

    1- Koningsdag!

    First is an expression meaning “King’s Day!.”
    Traditionally King’s Day (or Queen’s day) was a holiday in the Netherlands that celebrated the birthday of the king or queen. Nowadays the king’s birthday is still celebrated but the social element is more important.

    2- Dat wordt weer een mooi feestje!

    Then comes the phrase - “This will be a good party!.”
    On King’s Day, or in Dutch “Koningsdag”, there are big street parties and a lot of flea markets. People sell homemade foods or drinks in front of their houses. Everybody is dressed in orange, there are festivals going on everywhere, and in all the city centres there are fun activities. The atmosphere is always great.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik ga naar de vrijmarkt.

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “I’m going to the flea market.”
    Use this expression to share your plans for the day.

    2- Mijn oranje pak ligt alweer klaar.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “My orange outfit is ready for it.”
    Use this expression to share a personal detail about your traditional costume for King’s Day.

    3- Proost!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers!”
    This is an enthusiastic, positive interjection that expresses enjoyment and conveys the general mood of the day.

    4- Gefeliciteerd met onze koning!

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday to our King!”
    This is an old-fashioned well wish of the monarch in the Netherlands on King’s Day.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • feestje: “party”
  • markt: “market”
  • oranje: “orange”
  • Proost: “Cheers”
  • Koning: “King”
  • onze: “our”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    The King’s Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Dutch

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Sanne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of the celebration, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Bedankt allemaal voor de cadeaus en de verjaardagswensen!
    “Thanks everyone for the birthday wishes and gifts!”

    1- Bedankt allemaal

    First is an expression meaning “Thanks everyone.”
    Younger people will often blend Dutch with English vocabulary. It is not uncommon to replace the Dutch “bedankt” with “thanks”.

    2- voor de cadeaus en verjaardagswensen!

    Then comes the phrase - “for the birthday wishes and gifts!”
    In the Netherlands, when it’s your birthday you have to bring your own cake to your work or birthday party. Your friends, family and colleagues will bring you gifts for your birthday. This applies not only to children but to adults also.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Van harte!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional way to congratulate someone on their birthday.

    2- Gefeliciteerd! Ik hoop dat je een heerlijke dag hebt met je familie en vrienden.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! I hope you have a wonderful day with your family and friends.”
    This is a casual but warm-hearted well-wish and birthday congratulation.

    3- Fijne verjaardag!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday!”
    The traditional birthday wish.

    4- De taart was zo lekker! Ik wil meer!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “The cake was delicious! I want more!”
    These phrases share personal details about the birthday party in a humorous manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bedankt: “thanks”
  • verjaardag: “birthday”
  • vrienden: “friends”
  • fijn: “pleasant”
  • taart: “cake”
  • meer: “more”
  • cadeaus: “gifts”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Dutch

    Impress your friends with your Dutch New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Jan celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Gelukkig nieuwjaar iedereen! Proost!
    “Happy New Year, everyone! Cheers!”

    1- Gelukkig nieuwjaar iedereen

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year, everyone!”
    The words “new” and “year” have merged into one word when speaking of the new year that is about to start or has just started. Normally the words “new” and “year” are written separately. This is only relevant when you write it because in the pronunciation you don’t hear a difference.

    2- Proost!

    Then comes the phrase - “Cheers!”
    At midnight on New Year’s eve, people usually toast with champagne. A traditional snack that is only available around New Year’s is called “oliebol,” which can be translated as “oil ball,” a deep fried dough snack with raisins.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gelukkig nieuwjaar!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    This is the standard response to the poster’s New Year’s wish.

    2- Proost, op een mooi jaar!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers to a wonderful year!”
    Use this expression to toast the year to come, wishing everyone well.

    3- De beste wensen!

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Best wishes!”
    Use this expression for a short and traditional New Year’s wish.

    4- Jij ook gelukkig nieuwjaar!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year to you too!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster the same as he wishes you.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nieuwjaar: “New Year”
  • gelukkig: “happy”
  • jaar: “year”
  • beste wensen: “best wishes”
  • ook: “also”
  • iedereen: “everybody”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Dutch

    What will you say in Dutch about Christmas?

    Sanne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Kerst vieren met de familie. Veel te veel gegeten!
    “Celebrating Christmas with the family. I ate way too much!”

    1- Kerst vieren met de familie

    First is an expression meaning “Celebrating Christmas with the family. .”
    In the Netherlands, Christmas Eve is celebrated on the 24th of December. The first Christmas day is celebrated on the 25th of December. And the second Christmas Day is celebrated on the 26th of December. So there are two days of Christmas. Christmas dinner is usually celebrated with the family and extended family on either of the two Christmas days. On the first day of Christmas, everything is closed. However, on the 2nd day of Christmas, supermarkets sometimes open for limited hours.

    2- Ik heb veel te veel gegeten.

    Then comes the phrase - “I ate way too much!.”
    During Christmas there are so many homemade treats and family visits that people just eat all day long, and then there is also the Christmas dinner! So eating too much is a real thing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fijne kerstdagen!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas!”
    Use this expression as a traditional seasonal wish.

    2- Groetjes aan je ouders.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Say hi to your parents.”
    Give this instruction when you know the family, in particular the poster’s parents, and are known by them.

    3- Geniet ervan.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy it.”
    This is a short and sweet well wish.

    4- Iedereen een fijne kerst!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas to you all!”
    This is a jovial version of the traditional season wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Kerst: “Christmas”
  • Fijne kerstdagen: “Merry Christmas”
  • ouders: “parents”
  • genieten: “to enjoy”
  • jullie: “you (plural)”
  • vieren: “to celebrate”
  • familie: “family”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Dutch

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Dutch phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Jan celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of the two of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Ik ben de gelukkigste man op aarde dat ik jou al 1 jaar mijn vrouw mag noemen!
    “I’m the happiest man on earth that I may call you my wife for 1 year already!”

    1- Ik ben de gelukkigste man op aarde

    First is an expression meaning “I’m the happiest man on earth.”
    ‘Gelukkigste’, which is “happiest”, is the superlative of “gelukkig/happy”. When you are happy, you say: “Ik ben gelukkig”.

    2- dat ik jou al 1 jaar mijn vrouw mag noemen!

    Then comes the phrase - “that I may call you my wife for 1 year already!.”
    In Dutch the word “vrouw’ means both woman and wife, depending on the context. The same goes for husband. So ‘vrouw’ is “wife” in this context. Another word for “wife” is “echtgenote”, but this is only used in formal settings. For husband it is “echtgenoot”. But you won’t use these on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Je bent de beste! Ik hou van jou.

    His wife, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “You are the best! I love you.”
    Use these phrases to express your appreciation of the couple, and tell them of your affection for them.

    2- Gefeliciteerd lieverds!

    His wife’s high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats darlings!”
    This is an affectionate expression of congratulations. It could be used in settings other than this one, whenever you wish to casually congratulate more than one person.

    3- De tijd vliegt! Gefeliciteerd!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Time flies! Congrats!”
    These phrases express an opinion about fleeting time, and congratulations.

    4- Nog vele jaren.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “For many years.”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • jaar: “year”
  • Ik hou van jou: “I love you”
  • lieverd: “darling”
  • vliegen: “to fly”
  • veel: “many”
  • vrouw: “woman”
  • kwijt: “lost”
  • beste: “best”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Dutch! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Dutch

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    Learn how to apologize in Dutch - fast and accurately! DutchPod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Dutch Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Dutch
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Dutch
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Dutch through DutchPod101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Dutch

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Dutch. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Het spijt me.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Dutch or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Ik wil me graag verontschuldigen.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Dutch. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Ik wil mij oprecht verontschuldigen.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Ik zal het niet meer doen.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Ik zal ervoor zorgen om deze fout niet opnieuw te maken.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    Ik meende dat niet.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Het is mijn fout.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Het spijt me dat ik zo egoïstisch ben.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Ik hoop dat je me kunt vergeven.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Ik neem de volledige verantwoordelijkheid op me.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Ik had het niet moeten doen.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Sorry voor het te laat teruggeven van uw geld.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Wees alstublieft niet boos op me.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Sorry dat ik te laat ben.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Het spijt me dat ik zo naar tegen je deed.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Dutch

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Dutch! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at DutchPod101 about how to use the correct Dutch words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Dutch? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Dutch. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Dutch through DutchPod101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! DutchPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Dutch!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Dutch with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Dutch dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about DutchPod101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Dutch teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Dutch word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Dutch level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Dutch, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in DutchPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Dutch!

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    Prinsjesdag: Prince’s Day in the Netherlands

    Each year, the Netherlands observes Prinsjesdag, or “Prince’s Day.” Because this is the day the country officials go over the country’s budget proposals and new bills, many people also call this “Budget Day.” In the Netherlands, Prince’s Day is also a special day of celebration, and is the only time many people will ever see the Golden Carriage (which we’ll talk more about later).

    In the learning about Prince’s Day, you’ll also gain insight into certain aspects of the culture in the Netherlands. And as any successful language-learner can tell you, this is a vital step in mastering any language. DutchPod101.com can make this part of the learning process both fun and informative!

    Let’s get started with a little more about what Prince Day is.

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    1. What is Prince’s Day in the Netherlands?

    On Prince’s Day, Netherlands’ King gives the “Speech from the Throne,” or Troonrede Prinsjesdag, and the Minister of Finance presents the national budget proposal in a special briefcase to the Dutch House of Representatives. The national budget and the budget memorandum for the new year consist of new bills. Before ratification, these are debated in advance in the House and Senate.

    The famous briefcase the Minister of Finance uses to submit the budget memorandum has been in existence since 1947. The Minister of Finance at the time, Lieftinck, wanted to make Prince’s Day a little snazzier and decided to carry the documents with him in a classy briefcase. This practice remained customary for ten years until Minister Hofstra broke tradition, carrying the national budget with him in his bag. This didn’t sit well with many students, and they decided to just offer up a small briefcase to the Minister himself. The briefcase the Minister uses now has been in use since 1964.

    2. When is Prince Day?

    Prince's Day is in September

    Each year, the Dutch celebrate Prince’s Day on the third Tuesday in September. For your convenience, we’ve composed a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: September 17
    • 2020: September 15
    • 2021: September 21
    • 2022: September 20
    • 2023: September 19
    • 2024: September 17
    • 2025: September 16
    • 2026: September 15
    • 2027: September 21
    • 2028: September 19

    Earlier in history, around 1850, Prince’s Day fell on the third Monday in September, but since that meant some legislators had to leave on a Sunday, the date was moved to a Tuesday, thus the current date of the third Tuesday in September.

    3. Prince’s Day Traditions

    National Anthem Being Sung

    Prince’s Day is the only day the Golden Carriage ever ventures out. The Golden Carriage stays put almost the entire year in the Royal Stables behind the Noordeinde Palace (North-end Palace) in The Hague. Prince’s Day is the only day the carriage is permitted to venture out, traveling only a few miles to the Binnenhof parliamentary complex of the States-General and back.

    Only with rare exception is it possible to view the Golden Carriage up close. The Golden Carriage was once on display for all to admire up close at an exhibit in the Nieuwe Kerk in Amsterdam, but this exhibit was only there for a year.

    Of course, Prince’s Day is also famous for the King’s speech and the fancy briefcase mentioned earlier.

    4. Long Live the King

    Do you know what famous phrase ends the King’s annual speech?

    After the Speech from the Throne is delivered, the president of the Senate presiding over the Joint Session shouts “Long live the King!” to which everyone else in attendance responds, “Hooray! Hooray! Hooray!”

    After that, the King leaves the hall for the Queen’s Chamber in the adjacent room.

    5. Vocabulary You Should Know for Prince’s Day

    A Carriage

    Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for Prince’s Day!

    • Hoed — “Hat
    • Dinsdag — “Tuesday”
    • Paleis — “Palace”
    • Politiek — “Politics”
    • September — “September”
    • Prinsjesdag — “Prince’s Day”
    • Miljoenennota — “State’s budget”
    • Troonrede — “Queen’s speech”
    • Koningin — “Queen”
    • Beleid — “Policy”
    • Volkslied — “National Anthem
    • Minister — “Minister”
    • Regering — “Government”
    • Gouden koets — “Golden carriage”
    • Grondwet — “Constitution”
    • Koets — “Carriage”

    To hear the pronunciation of each vocabulary word, check out our Dutch Prince’s Day vocabulary list!

    Let DutchPod101 be Your Guide to the Dutch Language

    What are your thoughts on the Prince Day Netherlands holiday? Is there a similar holiday in your own country? Let us know in the comments!

    To continue learning about Dutch culture and the Dutch language, explore DutchPod101.com. We provide an array of fun and effective learning tools for every learner, at every level:

    • Insightful blog posts on a range of cultural and language-related topics
    • Free vocabulary lists covering a variety of topics and themes
    • Podcasts to improve your listening and pronunciation skills
    • Mobile apps to learn Dutch anywhere, on your own time
    • Much, much more!

    If you’re interested in a one-on-one approach to learning Dutch, be sure to upgrade to Premium Plus. Doing so will give you access to your own Dutch teacher who will help you put together a personal learning plan based on your needs and goals. Yes, really!

    Becoming truly fluent in any language is no easy task, but know that you can get there! And DutchPod101 will be here with you on each step of your language-learning journey.

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    Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Dutch

    Start off the year by learning how to introduce yourself properly in Dutch! Learn easily with DutchPod101 in this four-minute video!

    Table of Contents

    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Dutch
    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself
    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Dutch
    4. Why DutchPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Dutch Introductions

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    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Dutch

    ”About

    First impressions are absolutely everything! Right? No, wrong - who you are every day is much more important. But first impressions are definitely not unimportant either. Make sure to introduce yourself correctly, as it could mean the difference between getting a job offer or a polite refusal from an employer. DutchPod101 shows you how to read, write and pronounce these self-introductions and conversation-starters like a native speaker!

    But first, a tip - wait to be asked before offering personal details such as your age. Good conversation is about unspoken reciprocity, and giving too many personal details too soon can be embarrassing for your Dutch friend. Rather use phrases that encourage your friend to talk about him or herself - most people like doing that! Also, it shows you take real interest in other people.

    1- Hello, it’s nice to meet you.

    Hallo, leuk je te ontmoeten.

    This phrase is an excellent way to start an introduction. It is a greeting that immediately expresses interest in the other person.

    2- My name is Kevin.

    Mijn naam is Kevin.

    Self-explanatory - just replace ‘Kevin’ with your own name! Also, pay close attention to what your new Dutch acquaintance’s name is. Remembering it will make them feel that you are really interested in him/her as a person!

    Countries

    3- I’m from the Netherlands.

    Ik kom uit Nederland.

    Sharing something about yourself is a nice conversation starter. It shows that you’re willing to engage meaningfully with the other person. In an informal setting, you can expect the other person to respond in kind. At work, this is probably information you need to volunteer only if asked. Again, remember to replace ‘the Netherlands’ with your own country of birth!

    4- I live in Amsterdam.

    Ik woon in Amsterdam.

    Same as above - replace ‘Amsterdam’ with your town or city of abode!

    5- I’ve been learning Dutch for a year.

    Ik ben al een jaar Nederlands aan het leren.

    Say this only if it’s true, obviously. And prepare to dazzle your audience! If you have indeed worked faithfully at your Dutch for a year, you should be pretty good at it! Use this phrase after your introduction - it is likely to indicate that you wish to engage in Dutch conversation.

    Two people talking

    6- I’m learning Dutch at DutchPod101.com.

    Ik ben Nederlands aan het leren op DutchPod101.com.

    This will be the best reply if anyone asks (Very impressed, of course!) where you study Dutch! Simply volunteering this information, especially in a casual conversation, could make you sound like a salesperson, and you want to avoid that. Often, an employer will want this information though, so best to memorize and have this phrase handy!

    7- I’m 27 years old.

    Ik ben 27 jaar oud.

    This is a line that may just get you a ‘TMI!’ look from a stranger if you volunteer it without being asked. He/she may not be willing to divulge such an intimate detail about him/herself right at the start of your acquaintance, so don’t force reciprocity. However, it’s a good phrase to know in a job interview; again, probably best only if your prospective Dutch employer asks. Also, remember to give your true age!

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.innovativelanguage.com/sns/em/blog/19/08_self-introduction/first_encounter/Dutch_first_encounter-01.png

    8- I’m a teacher.

    Ik ben leraar.

    You’re still offering information about yourself, which lends good momentum to keep the conversation going! Replace ‘teacher’ with your own occupation - and learn the related vocabulary with DutchPod101!

    People with different jobs

    9- One of my hobbies is reading.

    Een van mijn hobby’s is lezen.

    Your hobby is another topic with lots of potential for starting a good conversation! People are often eager to talk about their hobbies, and why they like them!

    10- I enjoy listening to music.

    Ik geniet van het luisteren naar muziek.

    If you’re still talking about your hobbies, this would be a good line to go with the previous one. Otherwise, wait for your conversation partner to start talking about what they enjoy doing!

    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself

    Introducing yourself

    A correct Dutch introduction will make a good impression upon meeting a person for the first time. Why is this first impression important? Simple - it gives an indication of who you are as a person. So, while you want to be truthful when representing yourself, you also need to be prepared to put your best foot forward!

    First impressions are often lingering and difficult to change. In addition, it’s easier to make a negative impression than a good one, often without intending to. So, how can you make sure that your self-introduction will impress Dutch natives?

    1- Research: First, research the culture! Different cultures have different social rules, and you will be halfway towards making a great first impression if you know the proper Dutch customs for self-introductions. It will also help you avoid social mistakes - sometimes, what is acceptable in one culture is insulting in another, such as making eye contact, or giving a handshake. In your culture, what is appropriate when a person introduces him or herself?

    Also, be sure to distinguish between introductions in different situations, such as a formal and a social situation. There are bound to be differences in how you address people! The internet can be an important tool for this endeavor. Alternatively, you could visit your local library to search for books on this topic, or you could ask Dutch friends to explain and demonstrate their cultural habits for introductions. Honoring someone’s culture shows that you respect it, and as we know - a little respect can go a very long way in any relationship!

    Someone studying

    2- Study the Correct Phrases and Vocabulary: Be sure to learn Dutch phrases and vocabulary that tell people who you are, and that encourage them to engage in conversation with you. Each situation will determine how to address the person you want to introduce yourself to. Also, make sure your pronunciation is correct! It would be most valuable to have Dutch-speaking friends who can help you with this. Or read on for a quick phrase and video lesson on Dutch introductions right here at DutchPod101!

    3- Appearance: This is pretty obvious - if you want to make a good impression introducing yourself to anyone for the first time, you need to be neatly dressed and well groomed! A shabby, dirty or careless appearance and bad body odor are to be avoided at all costs; in most cultures, these will not impress!

    Also, make sure to dress appropriately, not only for the occasion, but also for the culture. For instance, bare shoulders or an open-necked shirt is an acceptable gear in many Western countries. Yet, in some cultures, dressing like this could deeply offend your host. No amount of good manners and properly expressed introductions is likely to wipe out a cultural no-no! So, be sure to know how to dress, and take care with your appearance when you are about to introduce yourself to someone for the first time!

    Following are some neat phrases with which you can introduce yourself in Dutch, and get a conversation started too!

    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Dutch

    Good, you read and perhaps even memorized the preceding phrases to successfully introduce yourself in Dutch! Watch this short video now to get a quick lesson on Dutch grammar for these introductions, as well as how to pronounce them correctly. You will sound like a native when you can copy the presenter perfectly!


    4. Why DutchPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Dutch Introductions

    • Culturally Focused Lessons: All our material is aimed not only to help you learn perfect Dutch, but also to introduce you to the Dutch culture! Learn here, for instance, a list of favorite Dutch foods. Alternatively, listen to these audio lessons on Dutch culture! Studying through us could be very valuable before visiting Netherlands for any purpose.
    • Accurate and Correct Pronunciation & Inflection: Our hosts and voice actors are native Dutch speakers of the best quality! It is important for us that you speak Dutch correctly to avoid embarrassing misunderstandings and miscommunications. If you practice and can copy these presenters well, you will sound just like Dutch natives and your introduction will be easily understood!
    • State-of-the-Art Lesson Formats and Methods: Efficacy in learning is our highest priority. You will have access to learning tools that were carefully developed by learning specialists over more than a decade! We use only well-researched, proven lesson formats and teaching methods to ensure fast, accurate, fun and easy learning! Millions of happy subscribers can’t be wrong! Create a lifetime account with DutchPod101 for free access to many learning tools that are updated every week.
    • Learn to Read and Write in Dutch: We don’t only teach you to speak, you can also learn to read and write in Dutch! This way you can express your Dutch introduction in more than one way and be thoroughly prepared.
    • A Learning Plan that Suits your Pocket: DutchPod101 takes pride in making learning not only easy and fun, but also affordable. Opening a lifetime account for free will offer you a free seven-day trial, after which you can join with an option that suits your needs and means. Learning Dutch has never been easier or more affordable! Even choosing only the ‘Basic’ option will give you access to everything you need to learn Dutch effectively, like thousands of audio and video lessons! However, if you need to learn Dutch fast, the Premium and Premium Plus options will be good to consider, as both offer a vast number of extra tools to ensure efficient learning. This way you can be sure that you will reach your learning goal easily!

    Whatever your needs are for learning Dutch, make sure to do it through DutchPod101, and you will never have to google: “How do I introduce myself in Dutch” again!

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