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How to Use Dutch Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Netherlands, using the correct Dutch numbers for counting in Dutch could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Dutch Numbers?
  3. Learning Dutch Numbers
  4. Why Choose DutchPod101 to Learn all about Dutch Numbers?

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1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Dutch Numbers?

For us at DutchPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Netherlands or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Dutch Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Dutch number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Dutch numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Dutch numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Dutch speaker and friendly DutchPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Dutch numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Dutch number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Dutch words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose DutchPod101 to Learn all about Dutch Numbers?

DutchPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! DutchPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Dutch!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Dutch with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Dutch dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about DutchPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Dutch teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Dutch word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Dutch level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with DutchPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Dutch numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Dutch on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Dutch, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Dutch.

At Learn Dutch, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Dutch in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Dutch

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Dutch. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Jan eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Jan’s post.

Uit eten met de mannen!
“Out for dinner with the guys!”

1- uit eten

First is an expression meaning “dining out.”
Thursdays and Fridays are especially popular to go out for dinner in the Netherlands. A word often related to food is “lekker,” which can be translated as “tasty” or “delicious.” In Dutch the verb “to eat” and the noun “food” are the same word: “eten”. It depends on the context and the sentence whether it is a verb or a noun.

2- met de mannen

Then comes the phrase - “with the guys.”
Note that this is only applicable to a group of guys. If you have a group of girls you would say “met de meiden,” which means “with the girls”. If the group is mixed you could say “met zijn allen,” which means “with all of us.”

COMMENTS

In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

1- Gezellig! Veel plezier!

His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Fun! Enjoy yourselves!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted towards the poster and wish him well.

2- Niet te veel eten.

His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t eat too much.”
Use this expression to admonish the poster to not overeat. Could be meant in a joking, teasing way, or it could be meant seriously. However, unless you know the poster well and has a very comfortable relationship, it’s seldom a good idea to instruct people on social media like they’re your children or inferiors!

3- Dat wordt genieten!

His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “It will be delicious!”
Use this expression if you want to comment on what the food looks like to you.

4- Eet smakelijk!

His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Bon appetit!”
This is a French loan-expression that roughly means: “Eat well!”

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mannen: “men”
  • gezellig: “fun (in social event)”
  • eten: “to eat”
  • genieten: “to enjoy”
  • smakelijk: “tasty”
  • plezier: “pleasure”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Dutch restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Dutch

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Dutch phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Sanne shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wij zijn even winkelen.
    “We’re out (for) shopping.”

    1- wij zijn

    First is an expression meaning “we are.”
    Dutch people like shopping. This is done alone, with family or with friends. In the big cities, there are various shopping centers to go to. The local markets are also very popular, and you can find anything you want here: clothes, fish stands, groceries, sweets, etc. Dutch people also like to make a quick trip to Belgium or Germany for some shopping.

    2- winkelen

    Then comes the phrase - “go shopping.”
    In most of the bigger cities, you will find that shops are open during the week, including Sundays. In the smaller cities, shops are open only one Sunday per month. Most shops are open from 9am to 5pm or 6pm, and they are also open at least one evening per week. Of course, supermarkets are open longer.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Geld moet rollen!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Money must flow!”
    Use this expression to make a joking comment on the poster’s apparent riches.

    2- Laat zien wat je hebt gekocht!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Show us what you bought!”
    Use this expression to show you curious about the poster’s purchases. A good conversation starter.

    3- Ik ben blij dat ik niet mee hoef.

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad I didn’t have to join”
    Use this expression when you’re not fond of shopping. Usually said in a joking, teasing manner.

    4- Wat leuk! Veel plezier, dames!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “How nice! Have fun, ladies!”
    Use this expression to wish someone a good time shopping.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • winkelen: “to shop”
  • geld: “money”
  • zien: “to see”
  • blij: “happy”
  • leuk: “nice”
  • veel: “many”
  • dames: “ladies”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Dutch

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Dutch.

    Jan plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team on the beach, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Wie gaat er mee volleyballen op het strand?
    “Who wants to go play volleyball on the beach?”

    1- wie gaat er mee volleyballen

    First is an expression meaning “who wants to go play volleyball.”
    Volleyball is a popular sport in the Netherlands. Everyone likes to play volleyball from time to time, both indoor and outdoor. Beach volleyball is played in the summertime on various beaches, and you can even join small tournaments with your friends.

    2- op het strand

    Then comes the phrase - “on the beach.”
    The Netherlands has lovely sandy beaches all along the west coast. They are far from tropical (no clear blue water), but the sand is nice. During the year there are a lot of surfers, and during the summer there are a lot of beach clubs along the water. Throughout the year it is nice to have a stroll down the beach, and in the summer, when the weather is nice, you can go swimming. Also, every night you can enjoy a beautiful sunset.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik heb al genoeg gesport vandaag.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “I already worked out enough for today.”
    Use this expression to explain that you’ve done a lot of exercise already, which is why you cannot join the game.

    2- Volgende keer ben ik er weer bij.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be there again next time.”
    Use this expression to state you intention to join in the teamsport next time.

    3- Ik wil mee!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I want to join!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling eager to join the team.

    4- Het weer is geweldig!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “The weather is amazing!”
    Use this expression just to make conversation by adding a positive comment about the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strand: “beach”
  • genoeg: “enough”
  • volgende: “next”
  • keer: “time”
  • weer: “weather”
  • geweldig: “amazing”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Dutch

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Sanne shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Leuk nummer dit! Gisteren gehoord op een feestje.
    “This is a great song! I heard it at a party yesterday.”

    1- Leuk nummer dit!

    First is an expression meaning “This is a great song!.”
    The Dutch word “nummer” can refer to a song, but it also means “number.”

    2- Gisteren gehoord op een feestje.

    Then comes the phrase - “I heard it at a party yesterday..”
    In the Netherlands, Thursdays are mostly student nights for partying or going out. Fridays are great for an after-work drink, followed by a party. Both Fridays and Saturdays are great for clubbing. In the summer there are a lot of outdoor festivals, both in Belgium and the Netherlands, even if the weather is not great.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lekker dansnummertje.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Great song to dance to.”
    Use this expression to share your opinion that you consider the song great to dance to.

    2- Ik ken deze al 2 maanden.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “I’ve known this already for two months.”
    Use this expression to brag a bit that the song is old news for you.

    3- Was het een leuk feestje?

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Was it a nice party?”
    Use this expression to show you are curious about the poster’s party, and want to know more.

    4- Super! Fijne beat.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Great! Nice beat.”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster, and think that the song has a good rhythm or percussion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nummer: “song”
  • goed: “good”
  • maand: “month”
  • feestje: “party”
  • dans: “dance”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Dutch Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Dutch!

    Jan goes to a DJ concert, posts an image of of the DJ at work, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    De sfeer zit er goed in! Wat een artiest!
    “Amazing atmosphere! What an artist!”

    1- De sfeer zit er goed in!

    First is an expression meaning “Amazing atmosphere!.”
    You can use this sentence in all kinds of social contexts: parties, concerts, dinners, events, meetings. It is sometimes used sarcastically to mean that the atmosphere is not so great.

    2- Wat een artiest!

    Then comes the phrase - “What an artist!.”
    There are a lot of well known Dutch DJs, such as DJ Tiesto, Armin van Buuren, Hardwell and Martin Garrix.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik was daar ook! Heb je niet gezien.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I was there too! I didn’t see you.”
    Use this expression to make conversation about a shared experience, or to joke a bit. Very often, these concerts are attended by thousands, so missing a person you know is easy.

    2- Kippenvel! Zo mooi!

    His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Goosebumps! Really beautiful!”
    Use this phrase to express how positively you experience the song.

    3- Wat bijzonder!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “How special!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that the song they posted is unique.

    4- Ik heb het album. Prachtige muziek.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I have the album. Beautiful music.”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that the artist is good, cause you have the album.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sfeer: “atmosphere”
  • daar: “there”
  • kippenvel: “goosebumps”
  • bijzonder: “special”
  • prachtig: “wonderful”
  • muziek: “music”
  • artiest: “artist”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Dutch

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Dutch phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Sanne accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik ben even niet bereikbaar. Mijn telefoon is kapot!
    “I’m unreachable. My phone is broken!”

    1- Ik ben even niet bereikbaar

    First is an expression meaning “I’m not reachable..”
    You can also use this sentence for your voicemail or when you are on holiday and can’t be reached.

    ‘Bereikbaar’ means reachable or available. It can also be used for a location, as in: “This place is hard to reach.” In Dutch, “Deze plek is moeilijk bereikbaar”

    2- Mijn telefoon is kapot

    Then comes the phrase - “My phone is broken!.”
    If you have some issues with your mobile phone, you could take it to one of the many small mobile phone repair shops. To replace a screen or camera, get a new charger or to have your phone made sim-free, this is the place to go if you don’t want to wait a long time at a bigger shop, or spend a lot of money on repair costs.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Het komt goed.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll be alright.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging.

    2- Ik stuur wel een kaartje.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll send a postcard instead.”
    Use this expression when you’re feeling humorous and want to joke with the poster about their status of unreachability.

    3- Wat een drama!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “What a drama!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster that losing a phone (or something else) is a big deal.

    4- Dat ziet er niet goed uit.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “That doesn’t look good.”
    Use this expression to show the poster that losing something important isn’t good, almost the same as sympathizing with them.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • telefoon: “phone”
  • komen: “to come”
  • kaartje: “postcard, entrance ticket”
  • drama: “drama”
  • kapot: “broken”
  • bereikbaar: “reachable, available”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in Dutch. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Dutch

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Dutch!

    Jan gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Ik verveel me. Iemand nog tips?
    “I’m bored. Anyone have any tips?”

    1- Ik verveel me

    First is an expression meaning “I’m bored.”
    Fun fact: in Dutch “bored” is a verb. No need to add “I am (bored)”. Bored is considered a verb in itself.

    2- Iemand nog tips?

    Then comes the phrase - “Anyone have any tips?.”
    This sentence is great to ask for tips and advice on social media. You can use it for anything. Maybe you are planning a trip and you want tips, or you have a problem and you want some advice. Just state what you want tips about, for example, “Weekend trip to Amsterdam,” and then say ‘iemand nog tips?’

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Het huis schoonmaken misschien?

    His girlfriend, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “Clean the house, maybe?”
    Use this expression as a suggestion to while away time, thus alleviating boredom. This is probably meant in a joking manner.

    2- Buiten een wandeling maken.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Take a walk outside.”
    This is another suggestion to relieve boredom.

    3- Kom gezellig koffie drinken!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Come by for coffee!”
    This is an invitation for coffee; in this context, it is meant to alleviate boredom.

    4- Wil je voetballen?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna play soccer?”
    Another invitation to help the poster deal with the extra time on hand.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tips: “recommendation”
  • huis: “house”
  • wandelen: “to take a walk”
  • koffie: “coffee”
  • voetballen: “to play a soccer”
  • buiten: “outside”
  • iemand: “anyone”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Dutch

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Dutch about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Sanne feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een dag! Ik kan wel een week slapen.
    “What a day! I can sleep for an entire week.”

    1- Wat een dag!

    First is an expression meaning “What a day!.”
    “wat een dag” - “what a day” you can use this sentence in all sorts of contexts, both positive and negative. Use it when you had a rough day, a great day, if something really particular happened, or when you are really tired.

    2- Ik kan wel een week slapen.

    Then comes the phrase - “I can sleep for an entire week..”
    Dutch and Belgian office hours usually run from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm with a 30 minute to 1 hour lunch break between 12:00 and 1pm.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ga lekker vroeg naar bed vanavond.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Go to bed early tonight.”
    Use this phrase if you mean to give the poster advice about their sleeping habits.

    2- Morgen weer een nieuwe dag!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Tomorrow’s another day!”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging, reminding them, in a way, that their fatigue will pass.

    3- Zet hem op!

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “You can do this!”
    Use this expression to be encouraging and positive.

    4- Het zijn drukke tijden.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “These are busy times.”
    This is a somewhat laconic statement, employed to be part of the conversation by stating the obvious.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • dag: “day”
  • bed: “bed”
  • morgen: “tomorrow”
  • nieuw: “new”
  • druk: “busy”
  • week: “week”
  • slapen: “to sleep”
  • tijd: “time”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Dutch! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Dutch

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Dutch.

    Jan suffers a painful knee injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Nou, even geen sport voor mij… Heb mijn knie verdraaid.
    “Well, no sports for me for now… Twisted my knee.”

    1- Nou, even geen sport voor mij…

    First is an expression meaning “Well, no sports for me for now….”
    “Nou” can’t be literally translated in English. It means something like “well” and is often used in a somewhat cynical context.

    2- Heb mijn knie verdraaid.

    Then comes the phrase - “Got my knee twisted..”
    On social media most posts are about yourself. So people often leave out the personal pronoun “I” = “ik”. Normally, you always need a personal pronoun before or after the verb in Dutch. But in written language, when a sentence is about yourself and the setting is informal like social media, you can start straight away with the verb, without the personal pronoun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik hoop dat het snel beter gaat.

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “I hope it will get better soon.”
    Use this expression to show that you are encouraging and wish the poster well.

    2- Wat is er gebeurd?

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Ask this question if you are curious about the details regarding the injury. Questions are a great way to keep a conversation going.

    3- Beterschap.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Get well.”
    Use this short expression to demonstrate goodwill and wish the poster a speedy recovery.

    4- Dus je gaat niet mee zaterdag?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “So you’re not coming Saturday?”
    This question is also asking for more details, as the poster’s injury clearly has implications.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • knie: “knee”
  • beter: “better”
  • wat: “what”
  • beterschap: “get well soon”
  • zaterdag: “Saturday”
  • even: “temporarily, for the time being”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Dutch

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Sanne feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een rotweer!
    “Such horrible weather!”

    1- wat een

    First is an expression meaning “such a.”
    The weather is probably the most favorite subject of discussion for the Dutch. It is often raining and people love to complain about it. Also, when the weather is great, people will often use this as a casual conversation starter. There is always something to say about the weather.

    2- rotweer

    Then comes the phrase - “horrible weather.”
    Because there is so much rain in the Netherlands, people are used to it. They will still go out to ride their bikes, and there is plenty to do and see indoors, like visiting nice museums.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Goed weer om binnen te blijven.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Great weather to stay inside.”
    Use this expression to put a positive spin on the situation.

    2- Hier schijnt de zon.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Here, the sun is shining.”
    Use this expression to share information and make conversation.

    3- Morgen zou het beter worden.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “It should be better tomorrow.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging by pointing out the positive.

    4- Wil je naar de bios?

    Her boyfriend, Jan, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna go to the movies?”
    Use this question to make a suggestion that will distract the poster’s attention from the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • weer: “weather”
  • binnen: “inside”
  • zon: “sun”
  • hier: “here”
  • bios: “cinema (slang)”
  • How would you comment in Dutch when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though! Why not talk about romance? That will lift anyone’s mood!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Dutch

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Jan changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Sanne together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Heel blij met deze dame.
    “Very happy with this lady.”

    1- heel blij

    First is an expression meaning “very happy.”
    When making a happy announcement, like a promotion, engagement, marriage, or birthday, it is customary to congratulate someone by saying: ‘Gefeliciteerd!’ (English: “Congratulations!” )

    2- met deze dame

    Then comes the phrase - “with this lady.”
    You could also wish the couple well by saying: ‘Veel geluk samen!’, which is - “Much happiness together!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gefeliciteerd!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    As said, this is the traditional way to congratulate anyone on positive news.

    2- Geweldig nieuws!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Great news!”
    Use this expression if you want to make it clear that you really good about the news.

    3- Veel geluk samen.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Much happiness together!”
    As said, this is another traditional way to congratulate specifically a couple on their relationship.

    4- Ik wil haar graag ontmoeten.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I would love to meet her.”
    This phrase indicates that you have not met the poster’s belle yet, but feel positive about the prospect.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • dame: “lady”
  • gefeliciteerd: “congratulations”
  • nieuws: “news”
  • geluk: “luck”
  • ontmoeten: “to meet”
  • blij: “happy”
  • samen: “together”
  • haar: “her”
  • What would you say in Dutch when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Dutch

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Dutch.

    Sanne is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Vandaag geef ik jou het ja-woord. Dit is de mooiste dag van mijn leven!
    “Today, I give you my vows. The most beautiful day of my life!”

    1- Vandaag geef ik jou het ja-woord

    First is an expression meaning “Today I give you my vows. .”
    Instead of just “I do” to confirm your wedding vows, the Dutch say “yes, I do”. Therefore, they say, “het ja-woord,” which literally means “the yes word.”

    2- De mooiste dag van mijn leven

    Then comes the phrase - “The most beautiful day of my life!.”
    Weddings in the Netherlands only last one day. It is usually a ceremony followed by a reception with a cake and some dancing. Sometimes, dinner is also offered, but this is usually only for a small group of close family and friends.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jullie zijn een prachtig stel!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “You’re a wonderful couple!”
    Use this expression when you feel really good about this match, and compliment the couple on it.

    2- Een prachtige dag voor een bruiloft. Gefeliciteerd!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “A beautiful day for a wedding. Congrats! ”
    Use this expression when you feel the weather is playing with for a beautiful wedding. You also congratulate the couple.

    3- Je bent de mooiste bruid!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “You’re the most beautiful bride!”
    Use this expression to compliment the bride on looking stunning.

    4- Gefeliciteerd. Veel geluk samen.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations. Much happiness together.”
    This is an old-fashioned or traditional congratulatory wish for newly-weds.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vandaag: “today”
  • stel: “couple”
  • bruiloft: “wedding”
  • bruid: “bride”
  • feliciteren: “to congratulate”
  • mooi: “beautiful”
  • dag: “day”
  • How would you respond in Dutch to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Dutch

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Dutch.

    Jan finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Het is officieel. We krijgen een kleine!
    “It’s official. We’re having a little one!”

    1- Het is officieel!

    First is an expression meaning “It’s official! .”
    You can use this expression for any big reveal: having a baby, announcing a new job, arranging travel plans, getting your diploma, etc.

    2- We krijgen een kleine!

    Then comes the phrase - “We are getting a little one!.”
    It is custom in the Netherlands for the name of the baby to be revealed only after the baby is born. After the baby’s arrival, all the friends and family receive a postcard with the name of the baby, the time it was born, and more info about if and when you can visit.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gefeliciteerd!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the customary, traditional short way to congratulate anyone on a big, positive happening in their lives.

    2- Krijg ik een neefje of een nichtje?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Will I get a nephew or a niece?”
    This questions shows that you are curious about the gender of the baby. Questions are good conversation starters.

    3- Gefeliciteerd! Wat een geweldig nieuws!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! What great news!”
    This is another positive and enthusiastic way to congratulate anyone on a happy announcement.

    4- Jullie eerste kindje! Gefeliciteerd!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Your first baby! Congratulations!”
    These phrases combine the traditional congratulations and an exclamation that states an obvious fact. Yet, the latter emphasizes obvious enthusiasm and happiness about the announcement.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • klein: “little”
  • krijgen: “to get”
  • neef: “nephew, cousin”
  • nicht: “niece, cousin”
  • kind: “child”
  • eerste: “first”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Dutch Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Dutch.

    Sanne plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Wat een schatje! Net als haar vader.
    “What a sweetheart! Just like her father.”

    1- Wat een schatje!

    First is an expression meaning “What a sweetheart!.”
    “schatje”= sweetheart is an expression you would only use for your partner, your child or a person/child very close to you.

    2- Net als haar vader.

    Then comes the phrase - “Just like her father..”
    “net als” is used to compare one thing with another. In this example, Sanne thinks the baby is as cute as its father. Aside from using this expression with people, it can also be used for objects or places. For instance: “De zee is blauw hier, net als tuis”, which means: “The sea is blue here, just like at home”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ze groeit zo snel.

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “She is growing so quickly”
    This is a positive comment pertaining to the baby’s development, a pretty standard one in most languages. It’s a way to partake in the conversation.

    2- Net als haar moeder!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Just like her mom!”
    Use this expression to compliment the mother.

    3- Ze lijkt meer op jou.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “She looks more like you.”
    Use this expression if you want to emphasize the similarity between the poster and the baby.

    4- Zo lief! Ik kom snel weer langs.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “So cute! I will pass by again soon.”
    These phrases expresses admiration for the baby, and announces that you will visit the family at home soon.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • schatje: “cutie”
  • snel: “quick”
  • moeder: “mother”
  • lijken: “to seem”
  • lief: “cute”
  • vader: “father”
  • If your friend is a mother or father showing off their cutie pie, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Dutch! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Dutch Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Jan goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    De hele familie bij elkaar, gezellig!
    “The whole family together, fun!”

    1- de hele familie bij elkaar

    First is an expression meaning “the whole family together.”
    “fam” is short for “familie”. This includes your direct family (Mom, Dad, and siblings), as well as your aunts, uncles, grandmas, grandpas, cousins and nephews.

    In Dutch there is no linguistic distinction between nephew and cousin, both mean ‘neef’. Same for niece and cousin; they both are called ‘nicht’ in Dutch.

    2- gezellig

    Then comes the phrase - “fun.”
    Family reunions in the Netherlands are very different depending on the family. In general, the most important family events of the year are birthday parties. These are celebrated with the whole family, as well as friends and neighbors. It doesn’t matter where you live in the Netherlands, if there is a birthday party, people will make an effort to enjoy the day with friends and family.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Wat een grote familie!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Such a big family!”
    Use this expression to comment on the size of the family. A good one to post if you’re not part of the poster’s family, or if you don’t know them well.

    2- Dit is zo saai.

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “This is so boring.”
    This is a personal opinion about family gatherings, and not a positive one.

    3- Ziet er gezellig uit!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Looks very cozy!”
    Use this expression if you feel the family members look comfortable and relatively happy together.

    4- Het was een hele leuke dag. Bedankt allemaal!

    His wife, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “It was a great day. Thanks, everyone!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful for a day that went well. It can be used as is for any type of day, not only a family gathering.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • familie: “family”
  • groot: “big”
  • saai: “boring”
  • zien: “to see”
  • bedankt: “thanks”
  • allemaal: “everyone”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Dutch

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Dutch about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Sanne waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik kan niet wachten! Zon, zee, strand, ik kom eraan!
    “I can’t wait! Sun, sea, beach, here I come!”

    1- Ik kan niet wachten!

    First is an expression meaning “I can’t wait!”
    You can use this sentence for any situation you anticipate with a lot of excitement.

    2- Zon, zee, strand, ik kom eraan!

    Then comes the phrase - “Sun, sea, beach, here I come!”
    As the weather is usually not great in the Netherlands, people love to go on holidays to warmer places like the south of Europe, Turkey or Egypt.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lekker! Geniet ervan!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful! Enjoy it!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling excited for the poster and wish them well.

    2- Fijne vakantie!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Happy holidays!”
    This phrase is an old-fashioned but often used to wish someone a good experience during the holidays.

    3- Niet te bruin worden hoor.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t get tanned too much.”
    This is an admonition for the poster to not stay in the sun for too long. Everyone knows the perils of sunburn, so this is just a reminder.

    4- Goede vlucht!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Nice flight!”
    Use this expression to wish the holiday-goers a pleasant flight to their destination.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wachten: “to wait”
  • kunnen: “to be able”
  • vakantie: “holiday”
  • niet: “not”
  • goed: “good”
  • vlucht: “flight”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Dutch!

    Hopefully the trip is great!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Dutch

    So maybe you’re strolling around at the local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Dutch phrases to use to share your experiences!

    Jan finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Wat een vondst! Misschien is het wel een miljoen waard!
    “Look what I found! Maybe it’s worth a million!”

    1- Wat een vondst!

    First is an expression meaning “Look what I found!.”
    “een vondst” is a find, a treasure. You can use it for an object but also for a place, like a really nice restaurant you found and want to share with your friends on social media. For this, you can use the sentence “wat een vondst!”

    2- Misschien is het wel een miljoen waard!

    Then comes the phrase - “Maybe it’s worth a million!.”
    In the Netherlands it is not common to haggle in shops. At local markets it is a bit more common, but for stalls selling vintage items it is usually acceptable. The rule-of-thumb is that when items have a label with a price on it, there is very little opportunity for haggling.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Heel bijzonder!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Very special!”
    Use this expression just to leave a comment and be part of the conversation. You agree with the poster that the find is unusual.

    2- Wat is het?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “What is it?”
    Ask this question to show you are interested in the topic, and would like to know more details.

    3- Misschien word je wel rijk!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Maybe you’ll be rich!”
    Share this opinion if you think the find may be worth something.

    4- Waar was dit?

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Where was this?”
    This is another question after more details, and a good way to oil the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • misschien: “maybe”
  • bijzonder: “particular”
  • heel: “very”
  • rijk: “rich”
  • waar: “where”
  • dit: “this”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Dutch

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Dutch, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Sanne visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Er gaat niks boven de Amsterdamse grachten!
    “Nothing beats the Amsterdam canals!”

    1- er gaat niks boven

    First is an expression meaning “nothing beats”.
    Literally translated this sentence means “there is nothing above”. You can use this when you really like or enjoy something: ‘Er gaat niks boven een koud biertje’, which means, “Nothing beats a cold beer”. Or: “Er gaat niks boven mama’s zelfgemaakte pannekoeken’, which means, “Nothing beats mom’s homemade pancakes”.

    2- de Amsterdamse grachten

    Then comes the phrase - “the Amsterdam canals.”
    Amsterdam has three major canals that form the historic centre. There are many other canals in the city, as well as two major rivers. One of those is Amsterdam’s access point to the North sea.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik ken nog een leuk lunchtentje, zit daar om de hoek

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “I know a lovely place to have lunch, just around the corner from there.”
    This comment shares a personal detail, demonstrating knowledge of the topic of discussion, and is a good way to stay part of the conversation.

    2- Niet voor mij, veel te druk.

    Her nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Not for me, way too busy.”
    Use this expression to share your opinion about a destination.

    3- Heerlijke stad!

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Wonderful city!”
    This expression is the opposite of the previous, negative one.

    4- Ik ga er binnenkort heen! Heb je nog tips?

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “I will go there soon! Any tips?”
    Use these phrases to indicate your intention to also visit the destination under discussion. You also ask for tips from friends about this destination.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • gracht: “canal”
  • hoek: “corner”
  • mij: “me”
  • stad: “city”
  • gaan: “to go”
  • hebben: “to have”
  • niks: “nothing”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Dutch

    So you’re doing nothing, yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Dutch!

    Jan enjoys himself at a beautiful place, posts an image of him relaxing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Koud biertje erbij. Ik ga nergens heen.
    “Cold drink in my hand. I’m not going anywhere.”

    1- Koud biertje erbij.

    First is an expression meaning “Cold drink in my hand..”
    The Dutch word “erbij” is not directly translatable in English. It is more of an informal slang word. It could be used in the context of an object that you are holding, like food or drinks as in this example. But it can also be used in a question form to ask if someone wants this particular food/drink item. For instance: “Biertje erbij?”, meaning “Would you like a beer with that?”

    2- Ik ga nergens heen.

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m not going anywhere…”
    Literally translated, this means “I’m going nowhere.” You can use this when you really like a place or situation (like a holiday, party, event or festival) and you want to stay there.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik kom eraan gast.

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I’m on my way, dude.”
    Use this expression to show you’re very keen to join the poster, wherever they are. This is meant to be a joke, unless you have an actual arrangement to meet, of course.

    2- Ziet er goed uit!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Looks great!”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation by exclaiming that the poster looks really good.

    3- Waar is dit ook alweer?

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Where is this again?”
    Use this question to find out more details about the poster’s destination.

    4- Hoor jij niet op het werk te zijn?

    His nephew, Bob, uses an expression meaning - “Shouldn’t you be at work?”
    This question is probably meant as a joke, just to be part of the discussion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bier: “beer”
  • nergens: “nowhere”
  • helemaal: “completely”
  • gast: “dude”
  • waar: “where”
  • werken: “to work”
  • ook alweer: “again”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Dutch When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Sanne returns home after a vacation, but posts an image of their holiday home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Ik mis dit nu al! Zullen we nog een weekje gaan?
    “I miss this already! Let’s go for another week, agree?”

    1- Ik mis dit nu al!

    First is an expression meaning “I miss this already!”
    You can use the phrase ‘Ik mis’, which means “I miss” for many things: a person, a situation, a job, the sun, etc. If you miss someone and you want to tell them you can say ‘Ik mis jou’ (”I miss you” ). “Ik mis” can be followed by any verb or article plus noun.

    2- Zullen we nog een weekje gaan?

    Then comes the phrase - “Let’s go for another week?”
    “Weekje” is the diminutive of “week,” which also means “week” in English. By placing “je” or “tje” behind a noun you turn a word into the diminutive form in Dutch. For example: ‘dagje’ (”little day” ) or ‘fototje’ (”little photo” ). It is a way of expressing positive feelings about the subject under discussion, and a typically Dutch way of talking.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik wil foto’s zien!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “I want to see the pictures!”
    Use this expression when you are keen to see the photos of the holiday.

    2- Ik kom morgen langs en wil al je verhalen horen.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “I will come by tomorrow and listen to your stories.”
    Use this expression to invite yourself over for a catch-up with the family.

    3- Waar ben je geweest?

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Where have you been?”
    This is a question to ask for more details about the destination of the holiday.

    4- Ik ben blij dat je het leuk hebt gehad.

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you enjoyed it.”
    This is a friendly expression of gratitude for the family’s sake, and a positive way to add to the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • terug: “back”
  • foto: “photo”
  • verhalen: “stories”
  • zijn: “to be”
  • blij: “happy”
  • langskomen: “to come by, to visit”
  • horen: “to hear”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as King’s Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Dutch

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Jan plans to partake in a King’s Day festival or party, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Koningsdag! Dat wordt weer een mooi feestje!
    “King’s Day! That’s going to be a great party again!”

    1- Koningsdag!

    First is an expression meaning “King’s Day!.”
    Traditionally King’s Day (or Queen’s day) was a holiday in the Netherlands that celebrated the birthday of the king or queen. Nowadays the king’s birthday is still celebrated but the social element is more important.

    2- Dat wordt weer een mooi feestje!

    Then comes the phrase - “This will be a good party!.”
    On King’s Day, or in Dutch “Koningsdag”, there are big street parties and a lot of flea markets. People sell homemade foods or drinks in front of their houses. Everybody is dressed in orange, there are festivals going on everywhere, and in all the city centres there are fun activities. The atmosphere is always great.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ik ga naar de vrijmarkt.

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “I’m going to the flea market.”
    Use this expression to share your plans for the day.

    2- Mijn oranje pak ligt alweer klaar.

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “My orange outfit is ready for it.”
    Use this expression to share a personal detail about your traditional costume for King’s Day.

    3- Proost!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers!”
    This is an enthusiastic, positive interjection that expresses enjoyment and conveys the general mood of the day.

    4- Gefeliciteerd met onze koning!

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday to our King!”
    This is an old-fashioned well wish of the monarch in the Netherlands on King’s Day.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • feestje: “party”
  • markt: “market”
  • oranje: “orange”
  • Proost: “Cheers”
  • Koning: “King”
  • onze: “our”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    The King’s Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Dutch

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Sanne goes to her birthday party, posts an image of the celebration, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Bedankt allemaal voor de cadeaus en de verjaardagswensen!
    “Thanks everyone for the birthday wishes and gifts!”

    1- Bedankt allemaal

    First is an expression meaning “Thanks everyone.”
    Younger people will often blend Dutch with English vocabulary. It is not uncommon to replace the Dutch “bedankt” with “thanks”.

    2- voor de cadeaus en verjaardagswensen!

    Then comes the phrase - “for the birthday wishes and gifts!”
    In the Netherlands, when it’s your birthday you have to bring your own cake to your work or birthday party. Your friends, family and colleagues will bring you gifts for your birthday. This applies not only to children but to adults also.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Van harte!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional way to congratulate someone on their birthday.

    2- Gefeliciteerd! Ik hoop dat je een heerlijke dag hebt met je familie en vrienden.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats! I hope you have a wonderful day with your family and friends.”
    This is a casual but warm-hearted well-wish and birthday congratulation.

    3- Fijne verjaardag!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday!”
    The traditional birthday wish.

    4- De taart was zo lekker! Ik wil meer!

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “The cake was delicious! I want more!”
    These phrases share personal details about the birthday party in a humorous manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bedankt: “thanks”
  • verjaardag: “birthday”
  • vrienden: “friends”
  • fijn: “pleasant”
  • taart: “cake”
  • meer: “more”
  • cadeaus: “gifts”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Dutch

    Impress your friends with your Dutch New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Jan celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Gelukkig nieuwjaar iedereen! Proost!
    “Happy New Year, everyone! Cheers!”

    1- Gelukkig nieuwjaar iedereen

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year, everyone!”
    The words “new” and “year” have merged into one word when speaking of the new year that is about to start or has just started. Normally the words “new” and “year” are written separately. This is only relevant when you write it because in the pronunciation you don’t hear a difference.

    2- Proost!

    Then comes the phrase - “Cheers!”
    At midnight on New Year’s eve, people usually toast with champagne. A traditional snack that is only available around New Year’s is called “oliebol,” which can be translated as “oil ball,” a deep fried dough snack with raisins.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gelukkig nieuwjaar!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year!”
    This is the standard response to the poster’s New Year’s wish.

    2- Proost, op een mooi jaar!

    His high school friend, Chantal, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers to a wonderful year!”
    Use this expression to toast the year to come, wishing everyone well.

    3- De beste wensen!

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Best wishes!”
    Use this expression for a short and traditional New Year’s wish.

    4- Jij ook gelukkig nieuwjaar!

    His college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year to you too!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster the same as he wishes you.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nieuwjaar: “New Year”
  • gelukkig: “happy”
  • jaar: “year”
  • beste wensen: “best wishes”
  • ook: “also”
  • iedereen: “everybody”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Dutch

    What will you say in Dutch about Christmas?

    Sanne celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Sanne’s post.

    Kerst vieren met de familie. Veel te veel gegeten!
    “Celebrating Christmas with the family. I ate way too much!”

    1- Kerst vieren met de familie

    First is an expression meaning “Celebrating Christmas with the family. .”
    In the Netherlands, Christmas Eve is celebrated on the 24th of December. The first Christmas day is celebrated on the 25th of December. And the second Christmas Day is celebrated on the 26th of December. So there are two days of Christmas. Christmas dinner is usually celebrated with the family and extended family on either of the two Christmas days. On the first day of Christmas, everything is closed. However, on the 2nd day of Christmas, supermarkets sometimes open for limited hours.

    2- Ik heb veel te veel gegeten.

    Then comes the phrase - “I ate way too much!.”
    During Christmas there are so many homemade treats and family visits that people just eat all day long, and then there is also the Christmas dinner! So eating too much is a real thing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Sanne’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fijne kerstdagen!

    Her supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas!”
    Use this expression as a traditional seasonal wish.

    2- Groetjes aan je ouders.

    Her neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Say hi to your parents.”
    Give this instruction when you know the family, in particular the poster’s parents, and are known by them.

    3- Geniet ervan.

    Her high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy it.”
    This is a short and sweet well wish.

    4- Iedereen een fijne kerst!

    Her college friend, Erik, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas to you all!”
    This is a jovial version of the traditional season wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Kerst: “Christmas”
  • Fijne kerstdagen: “Merry Christmas”
  • ouders: “parents”
  • genieten: “to enjoy”
  • jullie: “you (plural)”
  • vieren: “to celebrate”
  • familie: “family”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Dutch

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Dutch phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Jan celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of the two of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jan’s post.

    Ik ben de gelukkigste man op aarde dat ik jou al 1 jaar mijn vrouw mag noemen!
    “I’m the happiest man on earth that I may call you my wife for 1 year already!”

    1- Ik ben de gelukkigste man op aarde

    First is an expression meaning “I’m the happiest man on earth.”
    ‘Gelukkigste’, which is “happiest”, is the superlative of “gelukkig/happy”. When you are happy, you say: “Ik ben gelukkig”.

    2- dat ik jou al 1 jaar mijn vrouw mag noemen!

    Then comes the phrase - “that I may call you my wife for 1 year already!.”
    In Dutch the word “vrouw’ means both woman and wife, depending on the context. The same goes for husband. So ‘vrouw’ is “wife” in this context. Another word for “wife” is “echtgenote”, but this is only used in formal settings. For husband it is “echtgenoot”. But you won’t use these on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Je bent de beste! Ik hou van jou.

    His wife, Sanne, uses an expression meaning - “You are the best! I love you.”
    Use these phrases to express your appreciation of the couple, and tell them of your affection for them.

    2- Gefeliciteerd lieverds!

    His wife’s high school friend, Stephanie, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats darlings!”
    This is an affectionate expression of congratulations. It could be used in settings other than this one, whenever you wish to casually congratulate more than one person.

    3- De tijd vliegt! Gefeliciteerd!

    His neighbor, Linda, uses an expression meaning - “Time flies! Congrats!”
    These phrases express an opinion about fleeting time, and congratulations.

    4- Nog vele jaren.

    His supervisor, Nico, uses an expression meaning - “For many years.”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • jaar: “year”
  • Ik hou van jou: “I love you”
  • lieverd: “darling”
  • vliegen: “to fly”
  • veel: “many”
  • vrouw: “woman”
  • kwijt: “lost”
  • beste: “best”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Dutch! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Dutch

    Thumbnail

    Learn how to apologize in Dutch - fast and accurately! DutchPod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Dutch Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Dutch
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Dutch
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Dutch through DutchPod101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Dutch

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Dutch. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Het spijt me.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Dutch or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Ik wil me graag verontschuldigen.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Dutch. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Ik wil mij oprecht verontschuldigen.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Ik zal het niet meer doen.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Ik zal ervoor zorgen om deze fout niet opnieuw te maken.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    Ik meende dat niet.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Het is mijn fout.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Het spijt me dat ik zo egoïstisch ben.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Ik hoop dat je me kunt vergeven.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Ik neem de volledige verantwoordelijkheid op me.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Ik had het niet moeten doen.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Sorry voor het te laat teruggeven van uw geld.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Wees alstublieft niet boos op me.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Sorry dat ik te laat ben.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Het spijt me dat ik zo naar tegen je deed.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Dutch

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Dutch! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at DutchPod101 about how to use the correct Dutch words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Dutch? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Dutch. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Dutch through DutchPod101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! DutchPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Dutch!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Dutch with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Dutch dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about DutchPod101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Dutch teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Dutch word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Dutch level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Dutch, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in DutchPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Dutch!

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    Prinsjesdag: Prince’s Day in the Netherlands

    Each year, the Netherlands observes Prinsjesdag, or “Prince’s Day.” Because this is the day the country officials go over the country’s budget proposals and new bills, many people also call this “Budget Day.” In the Netherlands, Prince’s Day is also a special day of celebration, and is the only time many people will ever see the Golden Carriage (which we’ll talk more about later).

    In the learning about Prince’s Day, you’ll also gain insight into certain aspects of the culture in the Netherlands. And as any successful language-learner can tell you, this is a vital step in mastering any language. DutchPod101.com can make this part of the learning process both fun and informative!

    Let’s get started with a little more about what Prince Day is.

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    1. What is Prince’s Day in the Netherlands?

    On Prince’s Day, Netherlands’ King gives the “Speech from the Throne,” or Troonrede Prinsjesdag, and the Minister of Finance presents the national budget proposal in a special briefcase to the Dutch House of Representatives. The national budget and the budget memorandum for the new year consist of new bills. Before ratification, these are debated in advance in the House and Senate.

    The famous briefcase the Minister of Finance uses to submit the budget memorandum has been in existence since 1947. The Minister of Finance at the time, Lieftinck, wanted to make Prince’s Day a little snazzier and decided to carry the documents with him in a classy briefcase. This practice remained customary for ten years until Minister Hofstra broke tradition, carrying the national budget with him in his bag. This didn’t sit well with many students, and they decided to just offer up a small briefcase to the Minister himself. The briefcase the Minister uses now has been in use since 1964.

    2. When is Prince Day?

    Prince's Day is in September

    Each year, the Dutch celebrate Prince’s Day on the third Tuesday in September. For your convenience, we’ve composed a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: September 17
    • 2020: September 15
    • 2021: September 21
    • 2022: September 20
    • 2023: September 19
    • 2024: September 17
    • 2025: September 16
    • 2026: September 15
    • 2027: September 21
    • 2028: September 19

    Earlier in history, around 1850, Prince’s Day fell on the third Monday in September, but since that meant some legislators had to leave on a Sunday, the date was moved to a Tuesday, thus the current date of the third Tuesday in September.

    3. Prince’s Day Traditions

    National Anthem Being Sung

    Prince’s Day is the only day the Golden Carriage ever ventures out. The Golden Carriage stays put almost the entire year in the Royal Stables behind the Noordeinde Palace (North-end Palace) in The Hague. Prince’s Day is the only day the carriage is permitted to venture out, traveling only a few miles to the Binnenhof parliamentary complex of the States-General and back.

    Only with rare exception is it possible to view the Golden Carriage up close. The Golden Carriage was once on display for all to admire up close at an exhibit in the Nieuwe Kerk in Amsterdam, but this exhibit was only there for a year.

    Of course, Prince’s Day is also famous for the King’s speech and the fancy briefcase mentioned earlier.

    4. Long Live the King

    Do you know what famous phrase ends the King’s annual speech?

    After the Speech from the Throne is delivered, the president of the Senate presiding over the Joint Session shouts “Long live the King!” to which everyone else in attendance responds, “Hooray! Hooray! Hooray!”

    After that, the King leaves the hall for the Queen’s Chamber in the adjacent room.

    5. Vocabulary You Should Know for Prince’s Day

    A Carriage

    Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for Prince’s Day!

    • Hoed — “Hat
    • Dinsdag — “Tuesday”
    • Paleis — “Palace”
    • Politiek — “Politics”
    • September — “September”
    • Prinsjesdag — “Prince’s Day”
    • Miljoenennota — “State’s budget”
    • Troonrede — “Queen’s speech”
    • Koningin — “Queen”
    • Beleid — “Policy”
    • Volkslied — “National Anthem
    • Minister — “Minister”
    • Regering — “Government”
    • Gouden koets — “Golden carriage”
    • Grondwet — “Constitution”
    • Koets — “Carriage”

    To hear the pronunciation of each vocabulary word, check out our Dutch Prince’s Day vocabulary list!

    Let DutchPod101 be Your Guide to the Dutch Language

    What are your thoughts on the Prince Day Netherlands holiday? Is there a similar holiday in your own country? Let us know in the comments!

    To continue learning about Dutch culture and the Dutch language, explore DutchPod101.com. We provide an array of fun and effective learning tools for every learner, at every level:

    • Insightful blog posts on a range of cultural and language-related topics
    • Free vocabulary lists covering a variety of topics and themes
    • Podcasts to improve your listening and pronunciation skills
    • Mobile apps to learn Dutch anywhere, on your own time
    • Much, much more!

    If you’re interested in a one-on-one approach to learning Dutch, be sure to upgrade to Premium Plus. Doing so will give you access to your own Dutch teacher who will help you put together a personal learning plan based on your needs and goals. Yes, really!

    Becoming truly fluent in any language is no easy task, but know that you can get there! And DutchPod101 will be here with you on each step of your language-learning journey.

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    Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Dutch

    Start off the year by learning how to introduce yourself properly in Dutch! Learn easily with DutchPod101 in this four-minute video!

    Table of Contents

    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Dutch
    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself
    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Dutch
    4. Why DutchPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Dutch Introductions

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    1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Dutch

    ”About

    First impressions are absolutely everything! Right? No, wrong - who you are every day is much more important. But first impressions are definitely not unimportant either. Make sure to introduce yourself correctly, as it could mean the difference between getting a job offer or a polite refusal from an employer. DutchPod101 shows you how to read, write and pronounce these self-introductions and conversation-starters like a native speaker!

    But first, a tip - wait to be asked before offering personal details such as your age. Good conversation is about unspoken reciprocity, and giving too many personal details too soon can be embarrassing for your Dutch friend. Rather use phrases that encourage your friend to talk about him or herself - most people like doing that! Also, it shows you take real interest in other people.

    1- Hello, it’s nice to meet you.

    Hallo, leuk je te ontmoeten.

    This phrase is an excellent way to start an introduction. It is a greeting that immediately expresses interest in the other person.

    2- My name is Kevin.

    Mijn naam is Kevin.

    Self-explanatory - just replace ‘Kevin’ with your own name! Also, pay close attention to what your new Dutch acquaintance’s name is. Remembering it will make them feel that you are really interested in him/her as a person!

    Countries

    3- I’m from the Netherlands.

    Ik kom uit Nederland.

    Sharing something about yourself is a nice conversation starter. It shows that you’re willing to engage meaningfully with the other person. In an informal setting, you can expect the other person to respond in kind. At work, this is probably information you need to volunteer only if asked. Again, remember to replace ‘the Netherlands’ with your own country of birth!

    4- I live in Amsterdam.

    Ik woon in Amsterdam.

    Same as above - replace ‘Amsterdam’ with your town or city of abode!

    5- I’ve been learning Dutch for a year.

    Ik ben al een jaar Nederlands aan het leren.

    Say this only if it’s true, obviously. And prepare to dazzle your audience! If you have indeed worked faithfully at your Dutch for a year, you should be pretty good at it! Use this phrase after your introduction - it is likely to indicate that you wish to engage in Dutch conversation.

    Two people talking

    6- I’m learning Dutch at DutchPod101.com.

    Ik ben Nederlands aan het leren op DutchPod101.com.

    This will be the best reply if anyone asks (Very impressed, of course!) where you study Dutch! Simply volunteering this information, especially in a casual conversation, could make you sound like a salesperson, and you want to avoid that. Often, an employer will want this information though, so best to memorize and have this phrase handy!

    7- I’m 27 years old.

    Ik ben 27 jaar oud.

    This is a line that may just get you a ‘TMI!’ look from a stranger if you volunteer it without being asked. He/she may not be willing to divulge such an intimate detail about him/herself right at the start of your acquaintance, so don’t force reciprocity. However, it’s a good phrase to know in a job interview; again, probably best only if your prospective Dutch employer asks. Also, remember to give your true age!

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.innovativelanguage.com/sns/em/blog/19/08_self-introduction/first_encounter/Dutch_first_encounter-01.png

    8- I’m a teacher.

    Ik ben leraar.

    You’re still offering information about yourself, which lends good momentum to keep the conversation going! Replace ‘teacher’ with your own occupation - and learn the related vocabulary with DutchPod101!

    People with different jobs

    9- One of my hobbies is reading.

    Een van mijn hobby’s is lezen.

    Your hobby is another topic with lots of potential for starting a good conversation! People are often eager to talk about their hobbies, and why they like them!

    10- I enjoy listening to music.

    Ik geniet van het luisteren naar muziek.

    If you’re still talking about your hobbies, this would be a good line to go with the previous one. Otherwise, wait for your conversation partner to start talking about what they enjoy doing!

    2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself

    Introducing yourself

    A correct Dutch introduction will make a good impression upon meeting a person for the first time. Why is this first impression important? Simple - it gives an indication of who you are as a person. So, while you want to be truthful when representing yourself, you also need to be prepared to put your best foot forward!

    First impressions are often lingering and difficult to change. In addition, it’s easier to make a negative impression than a good one, often without intending to. So, how can you make sure that your self-introduction will impress Dutch natives?

    1- Research: First, research the culture! Different cultures have different social rules, and you will be halfway towards making a great first impression if you know the proper Dutch customs for self-introductions. It will also help you avoid social mistakes - sometimes, what is acceptable in one culture is insulting in another, such as making eye contact, or giving a handshake. In your culture, what is appropriate when a person introduces him or herself?

    Also, be sure to distinguish between introductions in different situations, such as a formal and a social situation. There are bound to be differences in how you address people! The internet can be an important tool for this endeavor. Alternatively, you could visit your local library to search for books on this topic, or you could ask Dutch friends to explain and demonstrate their cultural habits for introductions. Honoring someone’s culture shows that you respect it, and as we know - a little respect can go a very long way in any relationship!

    Someone studying

    2- Study the Correct Phrases and Vocabulary: Be sure to learn Dutch phrases and vocabulary that tell people who you are, and that encourage them to engage in conversation with you. Each situation will determine how to address the person you want to introduce yourself to. Also, make sure your pronunciation is correct! It would be most valuable to have Dutch-speaking friends who can help you with this. Or read on for a quick phrase and video lesson on Dutch introductions right here at DutchPod101!

    3- Appearance: This is pretty obvious - if you want to make a good impression introducing yourself to anyone for the first time, you need to be neatly dressed and well groomed! A shabby, dirty or careless appearance and bad body odor are to be avoided at all costs; in most cultures, these will not impress!

    Also, make sure to dress appropriately, not only for the occasion, but also for the culture. For instance, bare shoulders or an open-necked shirt is an acceptable gear in many Western countries. Yet, in some cultures, dressing like this could deeply offend your host. No amount of good manners and properly expressed introductions is likely to wipe out a cultural no-no! So, be sure to know how to dress, and take care with your appearance when you are about to introduce yourself to someone for the first time!

    Following are some neat phrases with which you can introduce yourself in Dutch, and get a conversation started too!

    3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Dutch

    Good, you read and perhaps even memorized the preceding phrases to successfully introduce yourself in Dutch! Watch this short video now to get a quick lesson on Dutch grammar for these introductions, as well as how to pronounce them correctly. You will sound like a native when you can copy the presenter perfectly!


    4. Why DutchPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Dutch Introductions

    • Culturally Focused Lessons: All our material is aimed not only to help you learn perfect Dutch, but also to introduce you to the Dutch culture! Learn here, for instance, a list of favorite Dutch foods. Alternatively, listen to these audio lessons on Dutch culture! Studying through us could be very valuable before visiting Netherlands for any purpose.
    • Accurate and Correct Pronunciation & Inflection: Our hosts and voice actors are native Dutch speakers of the best quality! It is important for us that you speak Dutch correctly to avoid embarrassing misunderstandings and miscommunications. If you practice and can copy these presenters well, you will sound just like Dutch natives and your introduction will be easily understood!
    • State-of-the-Art Lesson Formats and Methods: Efficacy in learning is our highest priority. You will have access to learning tools that were carefully developed by learning specialists over more than a decade! We use only well-researched, proven lesson formats and teaching methods to ensure fast, accurate, fun and easy learning! Millions of happy subscribers can’t be wrong! Create a lifetime account with DutchPod101 for free access to many learning tools that are updated every week.
    • Learn to Read and Write in Dutch: We don’t only teach you to speak, you can also learn to read and write in Dutch! This way you can express your Dutch introduction in more than one way and be thoroughly prepared.
    • A Learning Plan that Suits your Pocket: DutchPod101 takes pride in making learning not only easy and fun, but also affordable. Opening a lifetime account for free will offer you a free seven-day trial, after which you can join with an option that suits your needs and means. Learning Dutch has never been easier or more affordable! Even choosing only the ‘Basic’ option will give you access to everything you need to learn Dutch effectively, like thousands of audio and video lessons! However, if you need to learn Dutch fast, the Premium and Premium Plus options will be good to consider, as both offer a vast number of extra tools to ensure efficient learning. This way you can be sure that you will reach your learning goal easily!

    Whatever your needs are for learning Dutch, make sure to do it through DutchPod101, and you will never have to google: “How do I introduce myself in Dutch” again!

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    Netherlands’ Pentecostal Celebration: Pentecost Sunday

    What is Pentecost Sunday in the Netherlands?

    Each year, the Netherlands observes the Pentecostal celebration to remember the Covenant between God and Israel, as well as the descension of the Holy Spirit onto Christians. The Day of Pentecost is celebrated both as a religious holiday and as an opportunity to relax and enjoy life.

    In learning about the Dutch traditions for the Feast of Pentecost, you’ll see how Dutch culture intertwines with a holiday celebrated in various parts of the world. In turn, you’ll better absorb the Dutch way of life and the Netherlands’ culture, especially regarding religion. Understanding culture is one of the most essential steps in mastering any target language, and at DutchPod101.com, we hope to make this learning endeavor both fun and insightful!

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    1. What is Pentecost?

    So, what is the Day of Pentecost?

    Many people in the Netherlands view Pentecost as just a day off. For the younger generation especially, this is all Pentecost means. But we all know there’s way more to the story of Pentecost.

    It so happens that Pentecost derives from the Jewish Feast of Weeks, also known as Shavuot. Whereas Pentecost was formerly just a feast of thanks for bringing in a good harvest, Pentecost received a new meaning after the second century AD, namely as the day we commemorate the Covenant between God and Israel.

    2. Day of Pentecost: When is Pentecost?

    Enjoying the Spring

    The date of Pentecost varies from year to year in correspondence with Easter. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: June 9
    • 2020: May 31
    • 2021: May 23
    • 2022: June 5
    • 2023: May 28
    • 2024: May 19
    • 2025: June 8
    • 2026: May 24
    • 2027: May 16
    • 2028: June 4

    3. Reading Practice: Pentecost Celebrations in the Netherlands

    Holding a Religious Service

    How do the Dutch celebrate Pentecost? Read the Dutch text below to find out (and find the English translation directly below it).

    Pinksteren wordt gekenmerkt door veel openlucht muziekfestivals, vakanties en andere outdoor activiteiten.

    Pinkpop is een jaarlijks driedaags popfestival in Landgraaf, dat in het weekeinde van Pinksteren plaatsvindt. Het festival duurt drie dagen en trekt per dag ongeveer 60.000 mensen. Pinkpop is één van de langstlopende jaarlijks terugkerende popfestivalen ter wereld. In principe wordt het evenement altijd met Pinksteren gehouden, maar valt Pinksteren vroeg in het jaar dan wordt het in een ander weekend gevierd dat in of dichter bij de maand juni ligt. Rond de maand juni zijn de meeste bands op tour door Europa, wegens de vele festivallen hier. Veel bezoekers dragen tijdens het festival het iconische roze Pinkpop-petje.

    In Nederland maken veel mensen er een punt van om naar de kerk te gaan op Pinksterdag, zelfs als ze anders niet veel naar de kerk gaan. Het is ook een dag om te genieten van het buitenleven met fietsen of wandelen. Omdat deze feestdag in de lente valt, wordt het doorgaans door de mensen gebruikt om van het frisse lenteweer te genieten.

    Er worden ook nog steeds enkele tradities beoefend doorheen heel Nederland. In sommige gebieden, kiezen de ongetrouwde mannen van een stad een Pinksterbruid, een ongehuwd meisje dat ook in die stad woont. De bewoners versieren haar met bloemen en plaatsen een kroon op haar hoofd. Dan leidt ze een processie door de stad waarmee een tijd aanbreekt waarop van oudsher koppels werden gevormd. Veel Nederlandse paren komen in deze tijd samen, dus het is een populaire tijd van het jaar voor verlovingen of het begin van een relatie.

    Wist u dat de steden Amsterdam, Utrecht en Den Haag behoren tot de drie meest populaire steden om te gaan winkelen op een vrije dag? Naast het eindeloze aanbod van winkels, uitgaansgelegenheden, restaurants en musea staat Den Haag ook bekend om zijn stranden.

    Whit Sunday is marked by a great deal of outdoor music festivals, vacations, and other outdoor activities.

    Pinkpop is an annual, three-day pop music festival in Landgraaf that takes place during the Pentecost weekend. The festival runs for three days and attracts about 60,000 people a day. Pinkpop is one of the longest running annual pop festivals in the world. The event is always held during Pentecost in theory, but if Pentecost falls early in the year, it is celebrated on a different weekend where the dates are in or come closer to the month of June. Around the month of June, most bands are on tour throughout Europe, given the many festivals here. Many attendees wear the iconic pink Pinkpop hats during the festival.

    In the Netherlands, many people make a point of attending church on Whit Sunday, even if they do not go to church most of the time. It is also a day to enjoy the great outdoors by riding bikes or walking. Since this holiday falls during the spring, it is typically marked by people enjoying the fresh, spring weather.

    There are also some traditions still practiced throughout the Netherlands. In some areas, the single men of a town select a Pentecost bride, a single girl who also lives in the town. Townspeople decorate her with flowers and place a crown on the head. She leads a procession through the town, which then starts a time during which couples were traditionally formed. Many Dutch couples get together during this time, so it is a popular time of year for engagements or the beginning of a dating relationship.

    Did you know that Amsterdam, Utrecht and the Hague are among the three most popular cities for going shopping on a day off? In addition to the endless supply of stores, nightlife, restaurants and museums, the Hague and Amsterdam are also known for their beaches.

    4. What Does Pentecost Mean?

    Do you know what the Greek word Pentecoste means in Dutch?

    Pentecost is a cognate that derives from the Greek word Pentēkostē, which signifies the number fifty. This number refers to the day when Pentecost is celebrated.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for Pentecost in the Netherlands

    Gates of Heaven

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Pentecost in the Netherlands!

    • Kermis — “Fair”
    • Geboorte — “Birth”
    • Muziek — “Music”
    • Doop — “Christening”
      • Christening is the giving of another (Christian) name to someone after baptism, usually a baby.
    • Hemel — “Heaven”
    • Katholieke Kerk — “Catholic Church”
    • Voorjaarsfeest — “Spring-celebration”
    • Pinkstergemeente — “Pentecostal congregation”
    • Heilige Geest — “Holy Spirit”
    • Pinksteren — “Pentecost”
    • Kerkdienst — “Religious service”

    To hear each vocabulary word pronounced, check out our Dutch Pentecost vocabulary list. Here, each word is accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    Does your country celebrate Pentecost too? If so, what kind of traditions and celebrations do you have? Let us know in the comments!

    If you want to learn more about Dutch culture and the language, visit us at DutchPod101.com! It’s our goal to make your language-learning journey both fun and informative, and we provide this experience through practical learning tools and our whole-hearted support! Read more insightful blog posts like this one, study some of our free Dutch vocabulary lists, and chat with fellow students on our community forums.

    Know that your hard work will soon pay off, and you’ll be speaking Dutch like a native before you know it! DutchPod101.com will be here with you on each step of your journey to mastery!

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    Moederdag: Celebrate Mother’s Day in the Netherlands!

    In the Netherlands, holidays are celebrated with a lot of heart; Moederdag may be celebrated with even more heart! Moederdag (”Mother’s Day̶ ;) in the Netherlands is special among Dutch holidays, as it gives children and grandchildren a day to rejoice in their mothers.

    Another fun fact about family holidays: Netherlands first celebrated Mother’s Day before it celebrated Father’s Day! Do you know when each holiday was first celebrated here? We’ll give your curious mind the answer later. ;)

    At DutchPod101.com, we hope to make learning about holidays in Netherlands both fun and informative! So let’s get started.

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    1. What is Mother’s Day?

    We celebrate Mother’s Day being mindful of the fact that our mothers assume the role of caregiver for the family throughout the entire year, and that they have always done so. For this reason, Mother’s Day is when their children (and grandchildren) show their appreciation, respect, and love for them.

    Mother’s Day has been celebrated in the Netherlands for close to a century, each year seeing mothers cherished through gifts, quality time, kind words, and more!

    2. Mother’s Day Date: When is Mother’s Day?

    Mother's Day is on a Sunday

    The date of Mother’s Day in the Netherlands varies each year, but is always the second Sunday in May. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: May 12
    • 2020: May 10
    • 2021: May 9
    • 2022: May 8
    • 2023: May 14
    • 2024: May 12
    • 2025: May 11
    • 2026: May 10
    • 2027: May 9
    • 2028: May 14

    3. Reading Practice: How do the Dutch Celebrate Moederdag?

    Daughter Giving Mother Flowers

    Read the Dutch text below to find out how the Dutch celebrate Mother’s Day (and find the English translation directly below it).

    Op deze ene dag in het jaar word moederlief vrijgesteld van haar taken en op een voetstuk geplaatst. Kinderen leggen de moeder in de watten en begint de dag vaak met ontbijt op bed plus een cadeautje. Bij hele jonge kinderen wordt het cadeautje vaak een week van te voren al gemaakt op school. Op een latere leeftijd wordt het al gauw een bloemetje of zelfs een luchtje.

    On this one day of the year, mommy dearest gets to take a break and is put on a pedestal. Children pamper the mother and often start the day with breakfast in bed, plus a gift. As for really young kids, they often make the gift at school a week in advance. When they’re older, they move on to giving a flower or even perfume spray.

    4. Beginnings of Mother’s and Father’s Day

    When do you think Mother’s Day and Father’s Day were first celebrated in the Netherlands?

    Mother’s Day was celebrated in the Netherlands for over a decade before the first official Father’s Day ever was. Mother’s Day began around 1925 in the Netherlands, and Father’s Day didn’t start until 1937. So, Mother’s Day officially came earlier, so the fathers still have over a decade of catching up to do on presents!

    Another tidbit of information for you:

    Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are not to be confused for Mama and Papa days. These days, it’s becoming more common for both parents to hold jobs and the children to spend the day in elementary school and a daycare center. To keep this to a minimum, we have days off for parental leave in the form of “Mama” and “Papa” days.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for Mother’s Day in the Netherlands

    A Present

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Mother’s Day in the Netherlands!

    • Zondag — “Sunday”
    • Zoon — “Son”
    • Dochter — “Daughter”
    • Chocolade — “Chocolate
    • Diner — “Dinner”
    • Roos — “Rose”
    • Houden van — “Love”
    • Moeder — “Mother”
    • Cadeau — “Present”
    • Wenskaart — “Greeting card”
    • Moederdag — “Mother’s Day”
    • Cadeaubon — “Gift certificate”
    • Vieren — “Celebrate”
    • Ontbijt op bed — “Breakfast in bed”

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Mother’s Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think of Mother’s Day celebrations in the Netherlands? In what ways do you see the country’s culture reflected in this popular holiday? Are celebrations similar in your own country? Let us know in the comments! We’d love to hear from you.

    To learn more about Netherlands culture, visit us at DutchPod101.com. We offer insightful blog posts on a variety of topics about the Netherlands, as well as podcasts to keep you informed on the go! You can also check out our free vocabulary lists to expand your Dutch word bank, chat with fellow Dutch learners on our forums, and upgrade to Premium Plus to take advantage of our MyTeacher program! At DutchPod101.com, there’s something for every learner and every learner can master the language and culture of beautiful Netherlands!

    In the meantime, Gelukkige Moederdag! (”Happy Mother’s Day!” in Dutch). Be sure to give your mother, grandmother, or motherly figure some Mother’s Day flowers or a meaningful Mother’s Day gift!

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    How to Say I Love You in Dutch - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Dutch could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Dutch partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At DutchPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Dutch lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Dutch dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Dutch Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Dutch Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Dutch Faster?

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    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Dutch love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Dutch word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Dutch date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Dutch Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Heb je zin om met mij uiteten te gaan ?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Dutch is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Ben je dit weekend vrij?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Heb je zin om samen iets te gaan doen ?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • Hoe laat zullen we morgen afspreken?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Waar zullen we afspreken ?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Je ziet er goed uit.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Je bent zo schattig.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Wat vind je van deze plek?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Dutch language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Mag ik je nog eens zien ?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Zullen we ergens anders naartoe gaan?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • Ik weet een leuke plek.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Ik zal je naar huis rijden.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • Dat was een geweldige avond.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Wanneer kan ik je weer zien?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Ik zal je bellen.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Dutch phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Dutch below!

    Date Ideas in Dutch

    museum

    • museum

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • diner bij kaarslicht

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • naar de dierentuin gaan

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • een lange wandeling maken

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • naar de opera gaan

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • naar een aquarium gaan

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • een strandwandeling maken

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • gaan picknicken

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • samen een maaltijd koken

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • dineren en naar de film gaan

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Dutch

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Dutch - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Dutch Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Dutch yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Dutch? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Dutch love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Dutch

    I love you.

    • Ik hou van je.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Dutch carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Je betekent ontzettend veel voor me.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Wil jij mijn Valentijn zijn?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Je bent zo mooi.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Dutch, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Ik zie in jou in meer dan alleen een vriend.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Dutch dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Honderd harten zijn te weinig om al mijn liefde voor je te dragen.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Liefde is gewoon liefde. Er is geen verklaring voor.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Je bent zo knap.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Dutch love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • Ik ben verliefd op je.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Je zorgt er voor dat ik een betere man wil zijn.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Dutch girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • Laat alles wat je doet uit naam van de liefde zijn.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Mijn liefste, jij bent mijn zonneschijn.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Woorden kunnen mijn liefde voor jou niet omschrijven.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Wij zijn voor elkaar bestemd.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Als je aan iemand denk terwijl je dit leest ben je zeker verliefd.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Dutch Quotes about Love

    Dutch Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Dutch lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Dutch that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Dutch Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Dutch lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Dutch custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Dutch Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • We moeten praten.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Het ligt niet aan jou maar aan mij.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Dutch lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Ik ben gewoon nog niet klaar voor zo’n soort relatie.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Laten we gewoon vrienden zijn.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Dutch, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Ik denk dat we even rust nodig hebben.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Je verdient beter.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Het is tijd om andere mensen te ontmoeten.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Ik heb ruimte nodig.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Ik denk dat we te snel gaan.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Ik moet me concentreren op mijn carrière.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Ik ben niet goed genoeg voor je.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Ik hou niet meer van je.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • We zijn gewoon niet voor elkaar bedoeld.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Het is het beste.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • We zijn uit elkaar gegroeid.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Dutch faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. DutchPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Dutch language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Dutch Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Dutch speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    DutchPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Dutch, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Dutch even faster.

    2- Having your Dutch romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Dutch language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Dutch lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Dutch partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why DutchPod101 helps you learn Dutch Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Dutch

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Dutch is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at DutchPod101 is translated into both English and Dutch. So, while your partner can help you learn Dutch faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Dutch Culture
    At DutchPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Netherlands. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Dutch partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Dutch Phrases
    You now have access to DutchPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Dutch soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

    Learning A Language on Your Own

    Can You Really Learn Dutch Alone?

    Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

    Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Dutch or any language without traditional classroom instruction: DutchPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is DutchPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

    Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Dutch or any language alone.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

    3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

    Learning Alone

    1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

    In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Dutch alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

    2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

    Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Dutch alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Dutch and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

    3. Learning Dutch Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

    Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

    How to Learn a Language on Your Own with DutchPod101

    Learning with DutchPod101

    1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Dutch Audio & Video Lessons

    The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Dutch conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. DutchPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Dutch instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Dutch actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

    2. “Learning Paths” with Dutch Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

    Although DutchPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, DutchPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

    3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

    When you have the right tools and Dutch learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, DutchPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

    • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
    • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
    • Review Quizzes
    • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
    • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
    • Dutch Dictionary with Pronunciation
    • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
    • And Much More!

    Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Dutch alone and reach your goals!

    Conclusion

    Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Dutch on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

    DutchPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, DutchPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

    And the best part is: With DutchPod101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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    Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

    Avoid Awkward Silences

    Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Dutch well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Dutch conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

    Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

    Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Dutch greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

    However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Dutch as quickly as possible:

    • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
    • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
    • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Dutch faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

    But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Dutch people if you are just starting out?

    3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

    Conversation

    1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

    For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Dutch conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

    2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

    You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Dutch. In fact, with just a couple hundred Dutch words you could have a very basic Dutch conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

    3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

    If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Dutch, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

    DutchPod101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Dutch

    Learning Dutch

    For more than 10 years, DutchPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Dutch by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Dutch fast using our proven system:

    • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Dutch Instructors: DutchPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Dutch vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Dutch and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
    • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
    • 2000 Common Dutch Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

    In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

    Conclusion

    Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Dutch. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Dutch conversations or lessons is all it really takes. DutchPod101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Dutch and carry a conversation quickly.

    Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!