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Lesson Transcript

Hello, and welcome to the Culture Class- Holidays in the Netherlands Series at DutchPod101.com. In this series, we’re exploring the traditions behind Dutch holidays and observances. I’m Eric, and you're listening to Season 1, Lesson 1. New Year’s Day. In Dutch, this is [Nieuwjaarsdag]
Like in other countries, Dutch people greet New Year’s Day full of hope and goodwill. It may be because for most Dutch, this day offers the perfect excuse to eat an extra apple fritter, or [oliebol] in Dutch.
In this lesson, we’re going to learn how Dutch people celebrate New Year’s Day [Nieuwjaarsdag] and New Year’s Eve [Oudejaarsavond]!
Now, before we get into more detail, do you know the answer to this question?
Although apple fritters are not consumed everywhere in the world, they are well-known in many countries. Do you know what they are called in other countries?
If you don't already know, you’ll find out a bit later. Keep listening.
When the year changes, Dutch people all over the nation clink glasses of champagne together, and wish each other the best for the New Year. If you’re in Holland for the occasion, you’ll undoubtedly hear people say [Gelukkig Nieuwjaar], meaning “Happy New Year.” This goes hand in hand with beautiful firework shows that can be seen throughout the whole country. Children are allowed to shoot off small fireworks, or [vuurwerk], starting at 10 in the morning on New Year’s Eve. The big fireworks are reserved for adults, of course, to start off the New Year with a bang.
On New Year’s Eve, or [Oudejaarsavond] in Dutch, friends will gather together to enjoy a drink and snacks, and to watch the New Year’s Eve shows on TV. The New Year’s Eve shows are presented by well-known cabaret performers, who prepare comedy sketches about events that happened during the year. Just before midnight, the champagne bottles are brought out and everyone watches the countdown on TV. When the New Year finally arrives, Dutch people yell out Happy New Year, or [Gelukkig Nieuwjaar].
On New Year's Day, or [Nieuwjaarsdag], you’ll likely see many tired faces out and about. This is because many Dutch people don’t sleep on New Year’s Eve, partying late into the morning on New Year’s Day. But that doesn’t mean they stay in bed all day on the first day of the year. It’s actually the opposite. Along the coasts of Holland, thousands gather for the annual New Year’s polar bear plunge, or [nieuwjaarsduik]! The most popular location for this is called [Scheveningen] in The Hague. For many Dutch, this is the only true way to start the New Year afresh.
Now it's time to answer our quiz question-
Do you know what other countries call apple fritter or [oliebol]? In English, it’s called “Dutch Doughnuts” or “Dutchies.”
How did you like this lesson? Did you learn something interesting?
How do you celebrate New Year’s Eve in your country?
Leave us a message telling us at DutchPod101.com. See you next time!

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How do you celebrate New Year’s Eve in your country?