Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 10 - A Frustrating Situation in the Netherlands
INTRODUCTION
Kellie: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DutchPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 10 - A Frustrating Situation in the Netherlands. Kellie Here.
Jacob: Hallo, I'm Jacob.
Kellie: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express a wide range of emotions, such as anger and surprise. The conversation takes place at Pip's place.
Jacob: It's between Pip and Lukas.
Kellie: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal Dutch. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Pip: Ik kan het niet geloven! Een galblaasontsteking en ze gaan zeuren over een doorverwijsbriefje!
Lukas: Ja Pip, je zit hier in Holland. Eerst papieren, daarna komt de hulp!
Pip: Waarom is dit? Holland is een rijk land. En dan doen ze dit.
Lukas: Al heel lang is er een strijd tussen medisch personeel (artsen, sociaal werkers, psychologen, psychiaters, etc.) en de verzekeringsmaatschappijen. Maar alleen maar om de poen natuurlijk.
Pip: Belachelijk!
Lukas: Ben ik met je eens, maar zo werkt het soms nu eenmaal.
Pip: Dus de verzekeringsmaatschappijen bepalen hoe iemand behandeld wordt?
Lukas: Yep!
Kellie: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Pip: I can't believe it. A gallbladder infection and they start nagging you about a letter from your GP!
Lukas: Yes Pip, you're in Holland. Papers first and then comes the medical help!
Pip: Why is this? Holland is a rich country. And then they do things like this.
Lukas: For a long time already there has been a battle between medical personnel, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and so on and the insurance companies. All because of money of course.
Pip: Ridiculous!
Lukas: I agree, ridiculous, but that's the way things work sometimes.
Pip: So the insurance companies prescribe how somebody should be treated?
Lukas: Yep!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Kellie: I think I agree with Pip about how ridiculous the medical services sound.
Jacob: Me too, but that’s the way it is.
Kellie: The conversation we just heard was a friendly chat between friends.
Jacob: Yeah, having a friend that you can rant to and trust is very important.
Kellie: How are friendships conducted in the Netherlands?
Jacob: In the Netherlands, there’s a belief that friendships are different in the north and the south.
Kellie: Really? What are friendships like in the south?
Jacob: Friendships develop easier and more naturally in the south.
Kellie: And the north?
Jacob: Friendships take longer, but become deeper and long lasting.
Kellie: Is that really true?
Jacob: Honestly, I’m not sure, but that’s the common belief.
Kellie: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Kellie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Jacob: ontsteking [natural native speed]
Kellie: infection
Jacob: ontsteking[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: ontsteking [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: papier [natural native speed]
Kellie: paper
Jacob: papier[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: papier [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: strijd [natural native speed]
Kellie: struggle
Jacob: strijd[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: strijd [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: medisch [natural native speed]
Kellie: medical
Jacob: medisch[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: medisch [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: belachelijk [natural native speed]
Kellie: ridiculous
Jacob: belachelijk[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: belachelijk [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: mee eens zijn [natural native speed]
Kellie: to agree with
Jacob: mee eens zijn[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: mee eens zijn [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: verzekeringsmaatschappij [natural native speed]
Kellie: insurance company
Jacob: verzekeringsmaatschappij[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: verzekeringsmaatschappij [natural native speed]
Kellie: Next we have..
Jacob: behandelen [natural native speed]
Kellie: to treat
Jacob: behandelen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: behandelen [natural native speed]
Kellie: And lastly..
Jacob: poen (slang) [natural native speed]
Kellie: money
Jacob: poen (slang)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: poen (slang) [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Kellie: Let's take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Jacob: galblaasontsteking
Kellie: meaning "gallbladder infection"
Kellie: Let’s break it down.
Jacob: This word comes from galblaas, meaning “gallbladder” and ontsteking meaning “infection.”
Kellie: So this word is made up of two nouns.
Jacob: That’s right. In Dutch we write words like this without a space between them
Kellie: Whereas in English, we would leave a space.
Jacob: In fact, if you leave a space in Dutch, people might think that you have an ‘English Disease’!
Kellie: I hope you won’t ever have to use this word, but could you?
Jacob: Sure. For example, you can say... Hij is in het ziekenhuis opgenomen vanwege een galblaasonsteking.
Kellie: ...which means "He has been admitted to the hospital because of a gallbladder infection." Okay, what’s the next phrase?
Jacob: er is een strijd gaande
Kellie: meaning "there is a battle going on"
Kellie: What can you tell us about this expression?
Jacob: This is an idiom that is used to describe a battle between two or more parties.
Kellie: Where does the idiom come from?
Jacob: It uses some old language, such as gaande, a conjugation of the verb gaan, meaning “to go” which is hardly used anymore.
Kellie: What about the other words?
Jacob: Strijd means “battle” or “struggle” and er is means “there is”.
Kellie: How would you use this in a sentence?
Jacob: For example, you could say... Er is altijd een strijd gaande tussen matrozen en havenwerkers.
Kellie: ... which means "There's always a struggle going on between sailors and harbor workers." Okay, what's next?
Jacob: dus..[something]. bepaalt hoe
Kellie: meaning "so. [something].. decides how"
Kellie: Can you explain this expression for us?
Jacob: Dus means "therefore", but you should be careful when using it.
Kellie: Why is that?
Jacob: A lot of people use the word dus without reason, so it can be confusing for beginners.
Kellie: Remember that, listeners!
Jacob: Bepaalt is the third person singular of the verb bepalen, meaning “to decide”.
Kellie: Can you show us how you might use this in a sentence?
Jacob: Sure. For example, you can say... Dat bepaal ik zelf wel!
Kellie: ... which means "I'll decide about that myself!" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Kellie: In this lesson, you'll learn about expressing a wide range of emotions, including anger and surprise.
Kellie: Let’s start with anger, Jacob. Can you give us some hints on how to express anger in Dutch?
Jacob: Sure. You can express anger in different ways. Some people are polite and calm—others shout and scream.
Kellie: I’m usually calm when I’m angry. I think that can be scarier sometimes!
Jacob: Remind me not to make you angry then!
Kellie: (laughs) Can you give us examples of good phrases to use?
Jacob: Hier ben ik zeker niet blij mee!
Kellie: “I’m certainly not happy with this!”
Jacob: Ben je nu helemaal gek geworden?
Kellie: “Have you gone completely mad?”
Jacob: Ik denk dat we hier echt over moeten praten.
Kellie: “I think we really need to talk about this.”
Jacob: I like that last one. It’s good for calm people to use, like you, Kellie.
Kellie: I’ll make a note of that one! The other topic for this lesson was expressing surprise.
Jacob: You have to be careful when expressing surprise, as it can sometimes sound like anger.
Kellie: That’s right. Can you give us example phrases for showing surprise?
Jacob: Firstly, Nee toch!
Kellie: “Surely not!”
Jacob: Dit kan ik echt niet geloven.
Kellie: “I really can’t believe this!”
Jacob: Dat is toch niet waar!
Kellie: “That can’t be true, can it?”
Jacob: I think that those will help you show surprise.
Kellie: Thanks for that! So listeners, if you can remember these phrases, you’ll be able to express your anger and surprise in Dutch.

Outro

Kellie: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Jacob: Tot ziens!

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