Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DutchPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 13 - How Much Should You Tip in the Netherlands? Michael here.
Jacob: Hallo. I'm Jacob.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask “how” and “what” questions in Dutch. This conversation takes place at a restaurant table.
Jacob: It's between Burt and his Dutch friend Aad.
Michael: The conversation takes place between two friends, so they will be using informal Dutch. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Burt: Hier is de rekening. Hoe zullen we betalen?
Aad: Zoals de Engelsen zeggen: Let's go Dutch; ieder betaalt voor zichzelf.
Burt: OK, maar hoeveel fooi geef je in Nederland?
Aad: Ongeveer 10 à 15 procent. Als het heel lekker was, een beetje meer.
Burt: En wat doe je in een hotel?
Aad: Net zoiets.
Burt: En taxi's ook.
Aad: Allemaal ongeveer hetzelfde.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Burt: Hier is de rekening. Hoe zullen we betalen?
Aad: Zoals de Engelsen zeggen: Let's go Dutch; ieder betaalt voor zichzelf.
Burt: OK, maar hoeveel fooi geef je in Nederland?
Aad: Ongeveer 10 à 15 procent. Als het heel lekker was, een beetje meer.
Burt: En wat doe je in een hotel?
Aad: Net zoiets.
Burt: En taxi's ook.
Aad: Allemaal ongeveer hetzelfde.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Burt: Here's the bill. How shall we pay?
Aad: As the English say, let's go Dutch, meaning everybody pays for himself.
Burt: Okay, but what about tipping in the Netherlands?
Aad: Between 10 and 15 percent. If the meal was very good, you could give a little more.
Burt: And what about hotels?
Aad: Same thing really.
Burt: And taxis as well?
Aad: Yes, they’re all about the same.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Jacob, how do Dutch people pay in restaurants and other places? Do they share bills or does everyone pay for themselves?
Jacob: Well, the Dutch are notoriously famous for their stinginess. I guess you've heard the expressions like “Dutch treat” or “Going Dutch”.
Michael: I have! We use these phrases when each person participating in a group activity pays for themselves, rather than any person paying for anyone else.
Jacob: Exactly. But don’t worry, there are plenty of nice Dutch people. As for paying and tipping, the Netherlands follows the same conventions as most other European countries.
Michael: Ok, great to know. Now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Jacob: rekening [natural native speed]
Michael: check, bill
Jacob: re-ke-ning [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: rekening [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: hoe [natural native speed]
Michael: how
Jacob: hoe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: hoe [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: zichzelf [natural native speed]
Michael: oneself
Jacob: zich-zelf [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: zichzelf [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: fooi [natural native speed]
Michael: tip
Jacob: fooi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: fooi [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: hoeveel [natural native speed]
Michael: how much, many
Jacob: hoe-veel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: hoeveel [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: beetje [natural native speed]
Michael: a little, a bit
Jacob: bee-tje [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: beetje [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: meer [natural native speed]
Michael: more
Jacob: meer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: meer [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Jacob: ongeveer [natural native speed]
Michael: about
Jacob: on-ge-veer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jacob: ongeveer [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Jacob: Hoe zullen we betalen?
Michael: meaning "How shall we pay?" Can you break down this phrase?
Jacob: Sure. Hoe means “how”. Then we have the auxiliary verb zullen. It has the same function as “shall” in English. And we have the verb betalen meaning “to pay”.
Michael: So, literally…
Jacob: Hoe zullen we betalen?
Michael: "How shall we pay?". You can use this phrase when you need to ask about the process of payment in the restaurant or cafe for example. Jacob, can you give us another example?
Jacob: Sure. Zullen we samen betalen?
Michael: meaning "Shall we pay together?". Okay, what's the next phrase?
Jacob: It is Hoeveel fooi geef je?
Michael: meaning "How much will you tip?"
Jacob: The word hoeveel is made up of two words. It has hoe meaning “how” and veel, meaning “much”. So, hoeveel means “how much”. Then we have the noun Fooi meaning “tip”. Altogether, Hoeveel fooi geef je? means “How much will you tip?”
Michael: Okay, what's the last phrase?
Jacob: En wat doe je...
Michael: meaning “And what about…” or “What do you do about…” or just simply “What do you do". You can use this phrase to ask about something that has already being discussed.
Jacob: Right. In our dialog Burt asked Wat doe je in een hotel?
Michael: meaning “What about hotels?”
Jacob: It’s informal Dutch, but it would not be rude to use it in a formal situation. You can simply say En wat doe je
Michael: “What about..*
Jacob: Then the noun that you want to check. Wat doe je in een hotel?
Michael: “What about hotels?”
Jacob: Or even with a longer sentence like..Wat doe je als je verkouden bent.
Michael: “What do you do when you have a cold?” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you will learn how to ask “how” and “what” questions in Dutch. And our first key point of this grammar section is the question word “how”, which in Dutch is...
Jacob: Hoe. I think this is one of the most commonly used words in Dutch. Even when you meet another person, usually your first question will start with Hoe.
Michael: For example….
Jacob: Hoe gaat het?
Michael: meaning “How are you”, or literally “How goes it”? It is a rather formal and polite question.
Jacob: Right. In informal situations you can ask Hoe is het?
Michael: meaning “How are you doing?” or literally “How is it?”
Jacob: and in formal situations, you can say...Hoe maakt u het?
Michael: meaning “How are you, sir?” or “How are you ma’am?” It literally means “How makes it?”
Jacob: Hoe is also very often used in combination with other words.
Michael: Sometimes it is joined with another word, as in...
Jacob: hoeveel
Michael: meaning “how many”
Jacob: and sometimes it stays separate from the other word, as in hoe vaak
Michael: meaning “how often”
Jacob: hoe laat
Michael: meaning “at what time”
Jacob: or hoe lang
Michael: meaning “how long” or “how tall”. Using one of these, you can ask “How did you come here?”
Jacob:Hoe ben je gekomen? This sentence starts with the word Hoe meaning “how.” Hoe ben je gekomen?
Michael: "How did you come here?” Ok, Jacob, how would you ask a “what” question in Dutch?
Jacob: That's simple. First, we have a pronoun Wat? which is equivalent to the English word “what?”. You can use it to ask what something is, what happened.
Michael: For example you can say…
Jacob: Wat is dit?
Michael: meaning “What’s this?”
Jacob: Wat is dat grote gebouw daar?
Michael: meaning “What's that big building over there?” And.. what about “When”?
Jacob: It’s Wanneer. It is the equivalent of the English “When?”
Michael: Can you give us a sample sentence?
Jacob: Sure. Wanneer vertrekt de trein?
Michael: meaning “When does the train leave?”. Listeners, we have more question words in our lesson notes, so be sure to check them out.s

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Jacob: Tot ziens.s

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DutchPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:30 PM
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How is the tipping culture in your country?

DutchPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:03 PM
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Hoi ELIANA,


Thank you for commenting and welcome to DutchPod101.com!

We wish you all the best with your new study. How many lesson is all up to you 😁

Just take it easy i guess..no need to rush through it 😇


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

ELIANA
Friday at 07:56 PM
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I am starting to study DUTCH every day.

How many lessons do you recommend reading and listening per day ?

DutchPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:55 PM
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Hoi Mike,


It's 'Duitsers' :sunglasses: Haha, toen ik nog klein was gingen we altijd op wintersport naar Oostenrijk

en namen we ook altijd ons eigen eten mee. Ik weet niet of dat komt omdat de Nederlanders zuinig

zijn hoor. Misschien is het makkelijker? En bovendien...hagelslag vind je ook niet in elke winkel :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


Jacob,

Team DutchPod101.com

Mike
Friday at 05:57 AM
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Fooi geven in Frankrijk is netzoiets als in Nederland maar als ik de nederlander op vakantie hier kijk, begrijpen Zij niet hoe het doen! Mischien hun "stinginess" op vakantie kom terug. Ik weet dat in mijn baan welkome ik vaak nederlandse klanten (apartment rental)en ik vind het grappig als zij met auto komen omdat het auto met water,brood, groenten, beschuiten van Nederland vull is. Zij moeten denken dat de supermarkt in Nice te duur zijn. Het is ongeveer hetzelfde met de duitsen(can't remember if that's the adjective for German!)